Welcome to the TeamstersOnline.com.
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Taking A Stand!!!

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Local Union
    492
    Employer
    ABF
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    41,649
    Rep Power
    915

    Default Suburban 'Rosie the Riveters' loved the jobs they quietly gave up

    In honor of my grandma Dorothy who was a riveter and passed away six years ago tomorrow. Why does the government wait so long to decide to honor our heroes? It was the same way with the Navajo Code Talkers.

    They didn't think twice about heeding President Franklin Roosevelt's call to join the war effort to build a "Great Arsenal of Democracy" -- a unified mission to assemble ships and airplanes on the home front.

    But as unassumingly as suburban women flooded the workforce during World War II, they exited it just as quietly, leaving their posts to clear space for the returning men.
    More than 70 years later, some still hesitate to claim their contributions to munitions and war equipment production as "Rosie the Riveters."

    Efforts to find and formally honor these women who were so crucial to the war effort are finally getting underway, with more than two dozen "Rosies" flown to Washington last month as part of Women's History Month.

    But time is of the essence to document their stories, with most of the surviving women in their 80s or 90s.
    Suburban 'Rosie the Riveters' loved the jobs they quietly gave up

  2. Likes 222lifer, fxstc07, wizard Liked this post
  3. #2
    Retired !

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Local Union
    107
    Employer
    Retired - New Penn
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    16,880
    Rep Power
    366

    Default Re: Suburban 'Rosie the Riveters' loved the jobs they quietly gave up

    Great article and story about the women that moved the war effort.
    In our region we had the Frankford Arsenal. Started in 1812 as a storage facility, ammo manufacturing was started in 1846. All small ammo produced for World War II was manufactured at the Frankford Arsenal.
    My aunt worked there during the war.

    At one time, Philadelphia's Frankford Arsenal was called "The Street that Beat Hitler" because every round of small ammunition fired in World War II was made there.
    But those glory days seemed forgotten in 1977 when the government closed the Arsenal for good.
    The history that will be reflected at the museum began in 1812 when the federal government acquired acreage along the Frankford Creek as a storage depot.
    Manufacturing was added to the arsenal's mission in 1846, when America needed buckshot, sabers and flints to fight the Mexican War. The arsenal grew bigger in the Civil War and bigger still through both World Wars. Its research facilities developed the recoilless rifle, fire control equipment for tanks and pilot ejection systems, among many other things.
    Activity at the arsenal reached its peak during World War II, when there were more than 22,000 people working around the clock at the site.
    This article is old, dated 1991, but I remember as my family used to talk about the place. My aunt lived in the Mayfair section of the city which was next to the Frankford section.
    Philadelphia has many different sections of the city, all with their own names and personalities.

    Here is a big Thank You to all those women that moved the USA to Victory.

    Frankford Arsenal Museum In The Works - philly-archives

  4. Likes wizard, ABFwife Liked this post
  5. #3
    Retired !

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Local Union
    107
    Employer
    Retired - New Penn
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    16,880
    Rep Power
    366

    Default Re: Suburban 'Rosie the Riveters' loved the jobs they quietly gave up

    Another story I found today on all the "Rosie the Riveters" with some original pictures of woman working.

    The famous World War II propaganda image of ‘Rosie the Riveter’ may have been directly inspired by women like Norman Rockwell model Mary Doyle Keefe, who died in 2015, and actual riveter Rose Monroe. But Rosie’s enduring power was the result of her universality.
    As America’s men were called away to fight in World War II, women filled their industrial jobs as never before. When the federal government launched a plan to streamline the entire American workforce for maximum efficiency in 1942, the White House said it “definitely includes woman power.”
    Make sure to check out the pictures. Some great shots of the woman working on aircraft and radial engines.

    Rosie the Riveter History: See 15 WWII Photos of Women Working

  6. Likes ABFwife Liked this post
  7. #4
    Taking A Stand!!!

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Local Union
    492
    Employer
    ABF
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    41,649
    Rep Power
    915

    Default Re: Suburban 'Rosie the Riveters' loved the jobs they quietly gave up

    Quote Originally Posted by fxstc07 View Post
    Another story I found today on all the "Rosie the Riveters" with some original pictures of woman working.



    Make sure to check out the pictures. Some great shots of the woman working on aircraft and radial engines.

    Rosie the Riveter History: See 15 WWII Photos of Women Working
    Great pictures! I sure was looking for my grandma in those pictures taken in CA .

 

 

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •