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  1. #1
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    Default Ireland and history

    I visited this area during one of my trips. The Brú na Bóinne World Heritage Site is one not to be missed if you want to see and feel history from thousands of years ago. While I visited Newgrange and toured inside the tomb, the rest of the area is off limits to the general public due to this very reason. The hidden history of man.

    5,500-year-old passage tomb at Dowth is ‘find of a lifetime’
    A 5,500-year-old passage tomb uncovered at Dowth Hall in the heart of the Brú na Bóinne World Heritage site in Co Meath is “the most significant megalithic find in Ireland in the last 50 years”, archaeologists believe.

    The ancient burial chamber, believed to be about 40m in diameter and half the size of nearby Newgrange, was discovered during archaeological investigations by the agri-technology company Devenish and UCD school of archaeology.
    To date, two burial chambers have been discovered within the western part of the main passage tomb, over which a large stone cairn was raised.

    Archaeologists working on the site since May last year say the six kerbstones identified so far would have formed part of a ring of stones that followed the cairn perimeter.
    I have some pictures of stones with the same type of markings. They were on a rear section of the tomb at Newgrange.

    One kerbstone is heavily decorated with Neolithic carvings and represents “one of the most impressive discoveries of megalithic art in Ireland for decades”, the archaeologists said.
    https://www.irishtimes.com/news/scie...time-1.3567118

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    Default Re: Ireland and history

    This showed up on my FB this morning. I guess Ireland is experiencing drought just like the western U.S. is. Things that normally were hidden are now showing up.

    The Emerald Isle has not been so green as of late; Ireland is currently undergoing a historic drought, with some areas of the normally damp island experiencing the least amount of rain in some 160 years. It’s a sobering look into the future, since climate change is expected to hit Ireland particularly hard. But there is one positive to the dry weather. As Daniel Victor at The New York Times reports, a wilting agriculture field outside Dublin has revealed the remains of an undiscovered 4,500-year-old henge.

    Evidence of the prehistoric earthwork was first observed by Anthony Murphy, who runs the website Mythical Ireland. Since the heatwave and drought have been revealing crop marks of ancient castles and Iron Age forts in Wales and England in recent weeks, Murphy decided to fly his drone over the Boyne Valley to see if anything new was showing up in his area.

    Murphy was shocked when the drone revealed the outline of a circle stretching almost 500 feet in diameter in a field he’d flown over many times before. He shouted to his friend, photographer Ken Williams, who was also flying his drone nearby.

    “We knew fairly quickly that what we were seeing was something very special. And huge,” Murphy recounts in a blog post. He sent on their images to archaeologists who confirmed that indeed, the drone pilots had found the footprint of an unknown ancient henge, which could be up to 4,500 years old.
    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart...um=socialmedia

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    Default Re: Ireland and history

    A follow up to the story above posted by ABFwife.
    History of man, history of our planet, it's structures and inhabitants all fascinate me. Are we really alone ? Could ancient man have made those imposing structures ?
    To stand in front of the Newgrange tomb, to walk inside the immense structure and ponder the size of it all. To walk in the same path as man did thousands of years ago. Hard to fathom that we are just a grain of sand on the beach in comparison.
    The link has more to the story and a few more pictures.

    Immense timber structure found at ‘sacred’ Newgrange site during summer drought
    The full scale of archaeological discoveries at Newgrange revealed by the summer drought has been described as “staggering”.
    A series of “immense” timber palisade (wooden fences) walls measuring nearly a kilometre in length enclosed a vast ceremonial area which was used for mortuary rituals.
    Large ceremonial henges and enclosures of timber uprights indicate that the the Newgrange site was used for ceremonial purposes several centuries after the construction of the world-famous passage tomb and mounds.
    Archaeologists now believe that the Newgrange site was “sanctified” by the original passage tomb which made the site a place of pilgrimage for the generations that came afterwards.
    https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/h...ught-1.3739253

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    Default Re: Ireland and history

    A story from the Irish Post rating the country's cleanest ... and dirtiest cities.
    Been to a few of them, but mostly the country always appeared clean to me, with the exception of the large cities. More people = more trash.

    Ireland's cleanest and dirtiest towns have been revealed
    Now, new research from Irish Business Against Litter (IBAL) has revealed some of Ireland’s dirtiest towns as well as some of the Emerald Isle’s most sparklingly clean.
    Fermoy, in County Cork, claimed the accolade as Ireland’s cleanest town in 2018, while Waterford city was named Ireland’s cleanest city for the second year running.
    Fermoy was praised for exceeding "its usual high standards of cleanliness" by An Taisce, who carried out the research on behalf of IBAL.
    Athlone and Killarney earned similarly rave reviews. Coming in just behind Fermoy as Ireland’s second and third cleanest towns.
    The IBAL survey revealed just under 90% of Irish towns were deemed clean last year,
    Each of the following towns or regions were deemed cleaner than the standards set in Europe:
    I stayed in Castlebar one night and enjoyed an evening in the small city with a few pints and listening to local music.
    Galway is listed as one of the dirty towns. It is a large city, I wasn't impressed either during my stay there. Just another large populated town.
    The thing about Ireland is this. Drive 20 or 30 miles outside of any large metro area and in some cases, your taken back to times of long ago. Sheep herders riding wooden carts, small narrow one lane roads and places where they dig peat, by hand.

    https://www.irishpost.com/news/irela...evealed-163203

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    Default Re: Ireland and history

    Quote Originally Posted by fxstc07 View Post
    A story from the Irish Post rating the country's cleanest ... and dirtiest cities.
    Been to a few of them, but mostly the country always appeared clean to me, with the exception of the large cities. More people = more trash.

    Ireland's cleanest and dirtiest towns have been revealed


    I stayed in Castlebar one night and enjoyed an evening in the small city with a few pints and listening to local music.
    Galway is listed as one of the dirty towns. It is a large city, I wasn't impressed either during my stay there. Just another large populated town.
    The thing about Ireland is this. Drive 20 or 30 miles outside of any large metro area and in some cases, your taken back to times of long ago. Sheep herders riding wooden carts, small narrow one lane roads and places where they dig peat, by hand.

    https://www.irishpost.com/news/irela...evealed-163203

    I always said that if I ever do make it to Ireland, I do not want to spend time in the big cities. I want to see the small little country villages and I want to go to Derry and Donegal where part of my family are from. They might be big cities (I am assuming) but I would like to spend a day there and then off to the villages. I am really not an ocean/beach person. I see pictures of the little villages covered in trees and streams running through them. That is my dream, to see those places.


    BTW, a little off topic but some of you might be interested in a very good book I am reading right now. It was recommended to me by someone that knew I was Irish. It is called The Immortal Irishman by Timothy Egan. I am not far into it at all and yet I am hooked. It is about an Irish immigrant (who I had never heard of). He was a revolutionary and ended up in the U.S. in the 1800's.

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    Default Re: Ireland and history

    Follow up stories to the new finds at Newgrange. This place is amazing. Simply incredible that these structures were built thousands of years ago. I will visit again to see the changes since my visit in late 2014.

    Incredible hidden structures near Newgrange revealed in amazing detail
    Following last year’s incredible discovery of structures hidden near Newgrange, Co Meath, new digital models reveal the sites in even greater detail.
    From an archaeological standpoint, 2018 was a major high point in new discoveries, with the oppressive heatwave that swept the country last summer unexpectedly revealing many hidden structures beneath the surface of fields in the world-famous Brú na Bóinne region in Co Meath.
    With June and July being unusually dry, resulting in lengthy drought conditions, the soil eventually left a ghostly shadow of the structures beneath. Above ground when originally built, the likelihood is that they would have been left in disrepair over a period of centuries until eventually returning to the soil.
    https://www.siliconrepublic.com/inno...erial-pictures

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    Default Re: Ireland and history

    Ireland and history. Today is 70 years since Ireland left the British monarchy.

    Today marks 70 years since Ireland became a republic
    IT’S BEEN 70 years since Ireland officially became a republic.

    After the divisive Anglo-Irish Treaty was adopted in 1922, what’s now known as ‘Ireland’ was a 26-county Irish Free State. Bunreacht na hÉireann, or the Irish constitution, was then ratified by the Irish people in 1937, which is remains as the fundamental law of the State, and can only be altered by referendums.

    At midnight on 18 April 1949, Easter Monday, Ireland officially became a Republic and left the Commonwealth. At the time, a declaration of a republic ended Commonwealth membership, a rule that was changed afterwards.
    https://www.thejournal.ie/70-years-s...97795-Apr2019/

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    Default Re: Ireland and history

    Quote Originally Posted by fxstc07 View Post
    Ireland and history. Today is 70 years since Ireland left the British monarchy.

    Today marks 70 years since Ireland became a republic


    https://www.thejournal.ie/70-years-s...97795-Apr2019/
    Too bad it wasn't the whole Island.

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    Default Re: Ireland and history

    On my travels to Ireland I have yet to visit northern Ireland, specifically Belfast. My wife wanted to visit the Titanic memorial, but I felt a little uncomfortable being in an area still harboring fear and hatred from the riots. Now it seems to be escalating again, this time with the accidental death of a journalist during a riot in Derry a few days ago.
    Rest in peace Lyra McKee.

    Here's what we know about the riots in Northern Ireland
    The dramatic riot in Londonderry last week was starkly reminiscent of the violence that plagued Northern Ireland for decades before the 1998 peace agreement. The result was both tragic and familiar: the death of a young journalist, apparently hit by a stray bullet.
    The riot started Thursday evening, after police in Northern Ireland moved into the Creggan housing complex in Londonderry, searching for weapons and members of dissident groups. They were pelted with gasoline bombs and other objects, and several armored police cars were set alight.
    The riot attracted a crowd of residents and journalists. At one point, a gunman wearing a balaclava stepped out from behind a building, fired shots at the police and then took cover. No police were hit, but a bullet struck 29-year-old journalist Lyra McKee in the head, killing her.
    https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/...423-story.html

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    Default Re: Ireland and history

    Quote Originally Posted by fxstc07 View Post
    On my travels to Ireland I have yet to visit northern Ireland, specifically Belfast. My wife wanted to visit the Titanic memorial, but I felt a little uncomfortable being in an area still harboring fear and hatred from the riots. Now it seems to be escalating again, this time with the accidental death of a journalist during a riot in Derry a few days ago.
    Rest in peace Lyra McKee.

    Here's what we know about the riots in Northern Ireland


    https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/...423-story.html
    How very sad. And Derry is where my McLaughlin family is from and the area I really wanted to see one day. But I too changed my mind when I watched a travel show on PBS and saw the barriers and dividers still there keeping the protestant and Catholics separate from each other. I had no idea it was still like this and really made me not want to visit. There was a show on Netflix I watched a couple of years ago (and I absolutely cannot remember the name) and it showed murals of hate painted all over the buildings and the interviews of the northern Irish were filled with hate, many saying they were not Irish, totally loyal to the crown.

 

 
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