Results 1 to 4 of 4
Like Tree5Likes
  • 3 Post By RedRollingRoadblock
  • 1 Post By fxstc07
  • 1 Post By fxstc07

Thread: Falsely Accused of Shoplifting, But Retailers Demand Payments

  1. #1
    I Am Rocking Now

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Local Union
    81
    Employer
    Retired; OHFL
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    2,236
    Rep Power
    294

    Default Falsely Accused of Shoplifting, But Retailers Demand Payments

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/17/b...-they-pay.html

    Crystal Thompson was at home watching the Rose Bowl parade when a county sheriff came to arrest her for shoplifting from the local Walmart.

    Ms. Thompson, 43, was baffled and scared. An agoraphobic, she had not shopped at a Walmart in more than a year. She was taken to a Mobile jail, searched, held in a small room and required to remove her false teeth, something she didn’t even do in front of her husband.

    Four days after she returned home, the letters from Walmart’s lawyer started to arrive. The lawyer demanded that Ms. Thompson pay the company $200 or face a possible lawsuit. She received three letters over two months in early 2016.

    Shoplifting is an intractable problem for retailers, costing stores more than $17 billion a year, according to an industry estimate. To get the money back, many companies employ aggressive legal tactics and take advantage of loosely written state laws, pushing for restitution even when people have not been convicted of wrongdoing...

    Walmart and other companies have created well-oiled operations, hiring law firms to send tens of thousands of letters a year. Walmart set a collection goal of about $6 million in 2016 for one of its go-to firms, Palmer Reifler & Associates, according to a court paper filed as part of a lawsuit Ms. Thompson brought against the retailer. The firm also pointed out to Walmart that minors tended to pay off more frequently, the filing said.

    “It is my word against this company,” said Ms. Thompson, whose criminal case was dismissed after no one from Walmart appeared at a hearing to testify against her. “I’m nobody special. I didn’t feel like I had a prayer.”
    https://qz.com/1076348/a-shoplifting...ook-extortion/

    n 2016, the retailer came up with a solution. It hired two companies that would target the problem using education programs billed as “restorative justice,” a philosophy that addresses the community harm in a given crime, and avoids being unnecessarily punitive.

    The practices of one of these providers, the Corrective Education Company (CEC), have raised questions in recent years. In August, a California state court ruled in a lawsuit that its operations are “textbook extortion.” The case also suggests that CEC’s operations have little to do with the concept and intentions of restorative justice, an expert says...

    CEC’s founder, in an promotional video on the company’s website, says the program is meant to help people understand their behavior and its consequences, and includes an element that teaches “life skills,” such as how to build a resume or a nutrition plan. They can take the course at a later time, and the company says they have 48 hours to make up their minds...

    The suit in California, filed in 2015 by the San Francisco city attorney, Dennis Herrera, called the CEC process “extortion.” Detaining an accused shoplifter in order to show them the video should be considered false imprisonment, the suit alleged, something that big retailers have been accused of for years. A judge agreed in an Aug. 14 ruling, calling it a “textbook extortion,” and holding that the program indeed constituted illegal false imprisonment under California law—noting however, that he did not need to decide whether CEC’s program is beneficial or not to the public.
    While the Quartz article is a year old apparently it is still practice. The whole thing is disgusting.
    fxstc07, ABFwife and 222lifer like this.

  2. #2
    Retired !

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Local Union
    107
    Employer
    Retired - New Penn
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    15,667
    Rep Power
    342

    Default Re: Falsely Accused of Shoplifting, But Retailers Demand Payments

    Shoplifting is a large problem for most big box retailers.
    I had the ( not ) pleasure of attending a local court a few years back that was filled to capacity.
    It seems the local Walmart store has so many arrests that this particular court is filled each time with those arrested and charged.
    I wonder how much Walmart contributes to the local taxes and police force for all the extra duty and time to process their problems ?

    The short story was this. The prosecutor called for anyone there concerning a Walmart issue and were told to move to another room for further directions. After the room cleared ( maybe 50 or more people ) there were only about 5 people left for the court to deal with.

    Another case of Walmart costing all the taxpayers money.
    222lifer likes this.

  3. #3
    Taking A Stand!!!

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Local Union
    492
    Employer
    ABF
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    41,123
    Rep Power
    901

    Default Re: Falsely Accused of Shoplifting, But Retailers Demand Payments

    Quote Originally Posted by fxstc07 View Post
    Shoplifting is a large problem for most big box retailers.
    I had the ( not ) pleasure of attending a local court a few years back that was filled to capacity.
    It seems the local Walmart store has so many arrests that this particular court is filled each time with those arrested and charged.
    I wonder how much Walmart contributes to the local taxes and police force for all the extra duty and time to process their problems ?

    The short story was this. The prosecutor called for anyone there concerning a Walmart issue and were told to move to another room for further directions. After the room cleared ( maybe 50 or more people ) there were only about 5 people left for the court to deal with.

    Another case of Walmart costing all the taxpayers money.
    I had four different family members work at Walmart. In defense of the store, the shoplifting problem is huge. Although I don't agree with such tactics (in fact I think it is horrible), I would really think it is the shoplifters that are costing us tax payers.

  4. #4
    Retired !

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Local Union
    107
    Employer
    Retired - New Penn
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    15,667
    Rep Power
    342

    Default Re: Falsely Accused of Shoplifting, But Retailers Demand Payments

    Quote Originally Posted by ABFwife View Post
    I would really think it is the shoplifters that are costing us tax payers.
    That is true.
    However, most of these new stores are built with promises of tax exemptions, etc., which means the local taxpayer is footing the bill to have the Walmart in their locality. If the store itself doesn't provide tax income to the town in which they reside, then the only true benefactor is the Walmart family of shareholders. That doesn't include low wage issue that forces some employees to seek assistance from the county, state or federal government.

    Here is a 2 year old story, but details how Walmart's seem to be a hub of criminal activity.
    Low Prices, High Crime: Inside Walmart's Plan to Crack Down on Shoplifting
    The Walmart Supercenter in Camden, S.C., is a 24/7 retail oasis in an area with few options.
    In the first six months of 2016, 14% of the department’s police reports originated at Walmart, most for shoplifting—a figure that could be much higher if you ask the town’s police chief.
    The Tampa Bay Times found 16,800 calls to police for Walmarts in Pinellas, Hillsborough, Pasco and Hernando counties in just one year—four times the number of calls to Targets in the area—and amounting to the equivalent of two calls an hour.
    In Louisville, WDRB reported more than 9,200 calls for police at area Walmarts since 2012, by far the most of any location in the city.
    There are 400,000 fewer Walmart workers in the U.S. today compared with 10 years ago, potentially leaving stores even more vulnerable to crime.“They don’t understand that when you cut staffing, which includes security, your ‘shrink’ or inventory loss goes up,” Flickinger says. Fewer employees in stores often mean more opportunities for customers to steal, and he estimates that Walmart loses roughly 2 cents for each dollar in sales to shoplifting. Major retailers like Costco or WinCo have loss figures around seven-tenths of 1%, or less than a penny for each sale, Flickinger says.
    The story details the efforts of Walmart to reign in the shoplifting issue and a new ( then ) program called " Restorative Justice".

    Walmart Crime: Shoplifting at the Nation's Largest Retailer | Time
    ABFwife likes this.

 

 

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101