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  1. #1
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    Default Why isn’t communism as hated as nazism?

    there a few here on this forum



    WHY ISN’T COMMUNISM AS HATED AS NAZISM?


    Since the left dominates academia, they don't teach Communism's evil history


    It is obviously important to recognize the evils of Nazism, but why doesn’t Communism have an equally bad reputation?
    Today’s “anti-fascists,” especially in America and Europe, love to call people with opposing viewpoints Nazis.

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    Default Re: Why isn’t communism as hated as nazism?

    Are you one of "the few on this forum" ?
    Seems you like the sound of the jack booted thugs.

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    Default Re: Why isn’t communism as hated as nazism?

    I think the communism which was in Russia was a defense for the Masons and Jews against Christianity. It wiped out and controlled Christianity.......and a very similar ideal is sought today.

    They had their reasons. The "Jews" persecuted Christ and then the Christians....and the Christians returned the same to the "Jews".
    Jews were the target of the first crusade.
    Jews were banned repeatedly throughout Europe.
    They get in and do there thing and weaken Christianity, Christianity sees it, and the cycle continues.

    Hitler cast the Jewish communists out. He was a nationalist. He wanted his "race" to be as elite as the "Jews" perceived themselves imo....the Old Testament says they were chosen...and he wanted the supremacy that the Bible gave them.
    He cast the Jewish communists out of Germany. The worldwide Zionists despised him for it, declared war on Germany economically thru worldwide boycott .............then he did his ugly thing ....and had to fight Russian communists to his east................the Jews wanted communism in Germany and they got it....half. Germany was made communist after the war.
    I don't know about how Asian communism began...but that is my opinion on communism in Europe........and we walk a dangerous line by doing everything Zionist Israel wants especially with the debt nationally and personally how high it is imo.
    Know matter how much.people say they don't care what people believe or they want freedom of religion....I find it hard to believe that Zionism wants Christianity to have power or strength....it never works out well for them imo......that's my opinion.
    And although Islam is painted as the evil brute...Judaism and Christianity have been and can be just as brutal if not more......so the struggle continues.

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    Default Re: Why isn’t communism as hated as nazism?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commun...rty_of_Germany

    Early history[edit]
    Before the First World War the Social Democratic Party (SPD) was the largest party in Germany and the world's most successful socialist party. Although still officially claiming to be a Marxist party, by 1914 it had become in practice a reformist party. In 1914 the SPD members of the Reichstag voted in favour of the war. Left-wing members of the party, led by Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg, strongly opposed the war, and the SPD soon suffered a split, with the leftists forming the Independent Social Democratic Party of Germany (USPD) and the more radical Spartacist League. In November 1918, revolution broke out across Germany. The leftists, led by Rosa Luxemburg and the Spartacist League, formed the KPD at a founding congress held in Berlin in 30 December 1918 – 1 January 1919 in the reception hall of the City Council[2]
    There were seven main reports given:
    Economical Struggles — by Paul Lange
    Greeting speech — by Karl Radek
    International Conferences — by Hermann Duncker
    Our Organization — by Hugo Eberlein
    Our Program — by Rosa Luxemburg
    The crisis of the USPD — by Karl Liebknecht
    The National Assembly — by Paul Levi
    These reports were given by leading figures of the Spartakus League, however members of the Internationale Kommunisten Deutschlands also took part in the discussions
    Under the leadership of Liebknecht and Luxemburg, the KPD was committed to a violent revolution in Germany, and during 1919 and 1920 attempts to seize control of the government continued. Germany's Social Democratic government, which had come to power after the fall of the Monarchy, was vehemently opposed to the KPD's idea of socialism. With the new regime terrified of a Bolshevik Revolution in Germany, Defense Minister Gustav Noske formed a series of anti-communist paramilitary groups, dubbed "Freikorps", out of demobilized World War I veterans. During the failed so-called Spartacist uprising in Berlin of January 1919, Liebknecht and Luxemburg, who had not initiated the uprising but joined once it had begun, were captured by the Freikorps and murdered. The Party split a few months later into two factions, the KPD and the Communist Workers Party of Germany (KAPD).
    Following the assassination of Leo Jogiches, Paul Levi became the KPD leader. Other prominent members included Clara Zetkin, Paul Frölich, Hugo Eberlein, Franz Mehring, August Thalheimer, and Ernst Meyer. Levi led the party away from the policy of immediate revolution, in an effort to win over SPD and USPD voters and trade union officials. These efforts were rewarded when a substantial section of the USPD joined the KPD, making it a mass party for the first time.
    Through the 1920s the KPD was racked by internal conflict between more and less radical factions, partly reflecting the power struggles between Zinoviev and Stalin in Moscow. Germany was seen as being of central importance to the struggle for socialism, and the failure of the German revolution was a major setback. Eventually Levi was expelled in 1921 by the Comintern for "indiscipline." Further leadership changes took place in the 1920s. Supporters of the Left or Right Opposition to the Stalin-controlled Comintern leadership were expelled; of these, Heinrich Brandler, August Thalheimer and Paul Frölich set up a splinter Communist Party Opposition.


    The Nazi era[edit]
    Soon after the appointment of Adolf Hitler as Chancellor, the Reichstag was set on fire and Dutch council communist Marinus van der Lubbe was found near the building. The Nazis publicly blamed the fire on communist agitators in general, although in a German court in 1933, it was decided that van der Lubbe had acted alone, as he claimed to have done. After the fire, the Reichstag Fire Decree was passed.
    From then on, the party was subjected to severe repression. Indeed, the repression actually began within hours of the fire, when police arrested dozens of Communists. Although Hitler could have formally banned the KPD, courts treated KPD membership as an act of treason, since most judges held the KPD responsible for the fire. At the March 1933 election, the KPD elected 81 deputies. However, it was an open secret that they would never be allowed to take office; they were all arrested in short order. For all intents and purposes, the KPD was banned as of 6 March, the day after the election.[3]
    The KPD was efficiently suppressed by the Nazis. The most senior KPD leaders were Wilhelm Pieck and Walter Ulbricht, who went into exile in the Soviet Union. The KPD maintained an underground organisation in Germany throughout the Nazi period, but the loss of many core members severely weakened the Party's infrastructure.


    For a little backup to the above post.
    It looks like some the founders were Jewish as were those when Hitler was elected......and he banned them from German politics...with arrests and such.
    Last edited by slavenomore; 05-03-2017 at 02:36 PM.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Why isn’t communism as hated as nazism?

    See that the KPD Communists were banned masrch 6th..the day after their election.
    The worldwide boycott began in March also.....so was it really anti-Semitism they were fighting? or were they really fighting for communism with their boycott?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Nazi_boycott_of_1933
    In March 1933, the international critics, transformed their verbal protests into a worldwide, organized economic boycott against German goods.[
    However, the Central Jewish Association of Germany, was of the opinion that the Nazi government was not deliberately provoking anti-Jewish pogroms. It issued a statement of support for the regime and held that "the responsible government authorities [i.e. the Hitler regime] are unaware of the threatening situation," saying, "we do not believe our German fellow citizens will let themselves be carried away into committing excesses against the Jews
    There was some crime against Jews at the time....but it really took off after the German goods were boycotted worldwide......So was the war more about communism than we were taught?

 

 

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