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  1. #31
    Retired !

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    Default Re: Amid Puerto Rico’s Water Crisis, Unions Step In Where Trump Is Failing

    Quote Originally Posted by crazy View Post
    Puerto Rico power company will cancel contract with Whitefish, firm from Zinke's hometown, director says | Fox News

    Ramos says the cancellation will delay work by 10 to 12 weeks.

    Once again it is the little people who get hurt.. Instead of getting the work done just cancel and set the work back a few months.. But some will now blame Trump..
    So it would have been smart to spend two and three times as much for the work ... because of why ?

    The whole thing had a distinct smell of something fishy. Like swamp water.

  2. #32
    I Am Rocking Now

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    Default Re: Amid Puerto Rico’s Water Crisis, Unions Step In Where Trump Is Failing

    Quote Originally Posted by fxstc07 View Post
    So it would have been smart to spend two and three times as much for the work ... because of why ?

    The whole thing had a distinct smell of something fishy. Like swamp water.
    Have to find out how they got the contract in the first place.. A contract requires more than one signature.

  3. #33
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    Default Re: Amid Puerto Rico’s Water Crisis, Unions Step In Where Trump Is Failing

    I have been pricing and shopping water purification tabs and devices.
    Talk about expensive. Many are sold out, many have over inflated prices for the same product.

    Just spent over $400 for tabs and emergency lamps. Can't afford a real water filtration device that I could trust.

  4. #34
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    Default Re: Amid Puerto Rico’s Water Crisis, Unions Step In Where Trump Is Failing

    Time to start packing.
    Leaving early AM Sunday.
    Will talk to you all on my return.

  5. Likes 222lifer, crazy, ABFwife Liked this post
  6. #35
    I Am Rocking Now

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    Default Re: Amid Puerto Rico’s Water Crisis, Unions Step In Where Trump Is Failing

    Quote Originally Posted by fxstc07 View Post
    Time to start packing.
    Leaving early AM Sunday.
    Will talk to you all on my return.
    Safe trip brother..

  7. #36
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    Default Re: Amid Puerto Rico’s Water Crisis, Unions Step In Where Trump Is Failing

    Yes, I am back.
    Tired and need some rest, but have piles of mail and bills to go over, plus the need to service the wife's car before she returns to work Monday.
    Bottom line, a quick assessment of what I saw and heard.

    Things are still horrible !
    My entire time staying at the Lutheran synod office and camp we had no electric. The water wasn't suitable to drink. Ice is in short supply and the lines are long, when available. Some areas didn't have any water and it's either trucked in, or in the mountain regions a pump and filtration device was set up. People had to travel to that one location for water. Bottled water is also in short supply. Food is available, but many restaurants are still closed and being cleaned and sanitized. Traffic lights only work in around 10% of the locations with far outlining areas not working at all. Traffic in the city is a nightmare with limited traffic control officers. ( I did see a N.J. State Trooper and his vehicle on one location ) Everyplace was packed that was open. Costco was nuts ! Check out lines exceeded 45 minutes to get to a register. Trucks lined up to deliver as fast as the stuff moved out the front door. No restrictions on what you can buy, but they had no bottled water either when I was there.
    The electric repair crews were few and far between. ( my guess is I counted less then 10 different repair crews working ) One relative of the Pastor's had electric Monday night when we did a quick visit, and by Thursday night she was without power again, after the power transmission line failure was announced. Another family member, in a middle class neighborhood, hasn't had power at all since the storm. Poles and light standards down everywhere and just pushed to the side to open the roads. Transformers laying smashed and open on the streets. Limited, and I mean limited, open schools. Gasoline was around $2.80 to 2.90 per gallon, available if the station had power. No portable generators available. All sold and in use. Trucked in power generators everywhere powering pump stations and other necessary buildings. The homes were a sea of "blue tarps" covering damaged roofs. One home we visited was 2 miles ( yes ... two miles ) from the river that overflowed it's banks, and still got 5 feet of water inside.
    Death toll stands at over 1000 ... which hasn't been mentioned. More then 100,000 people have left the island, mostly to places in the US.
    Hardly any US military presence and what we saw were Puerto Rico National Guard members on duty.
    Communication was sporadic, data transmission very limited. Cell service worked on AT&T, but other providers had non-existent service, or very little depending on location.
    All major roads open and cleared. The main highway roads were well maintained ( except in the inner city and impoverished areas ) and better then many here in the US.
    My blunt assessment.
    If Trump gave his administration a 10 out of 10 response to the hurricane effort, he is truly clueless.
    The people of P.R. are doing for themselves. With the Jones act back in place, it has restricted incoming goods and inflated the prices of what has hit the shores.
    It was a sad and humbling experience.
    When I gather more thoughts and upload a few pics, I will write and post more. Time to attend to home and wife now.
    Glad I am home. Sorry I couldn't help more.

  8. Likes 222lifer, crazy, ABFwife, fedexnuno Liked this post
  9. #37
    Scab Hating Union Thug

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    Default Re: Amid Puerto Rico’s Water Crisis, Unions Step In Where Trump Is Failing

    Quote Originally Posted by fxstc07 View Post
    Yes, I am back.
    Tired and need some rest, but have piles of mail and bills to go over, plus the need to service the wife's car before she returns to work Monday.
    Bottom line, a quick assessment of what I saw and heard.

    Things are still horrible !
    My entire time staying at the Lutheran synod office and camp we had no electric. The water wasn't suitable to drink. Ice is in short supply and the lines are long, when available. Some areas didn't have any water and it's either trucked in, or in the mountain regions a pump and filtration device was set up. People had to travel to that one location for water. Bottled water is also in short supply. Food is available, but many restaurants are still closed and being cleaned and sanitized. Traffic lights only work in around 10% of the locations with far outlining areas not working at all. Traffic in the city is a nightmare with limited traffic control officers. ( I did see a N.J. State Trooper and his vehicle on one location ) Everyplace was packed that was open. Costco was nuts ! Check out lines exceeded 45 minutes to get to a register. Trucks lined up to deliver as fast as the stuff moved out the front door. No restrictions on what you can buy, but they had no bottled water either when I was there.
    The electric repair crews were few and far between. ( my guess is I counted less then 10 different repair crews working ) One relative of the Pastor's had electric Monday night when we did a quick visit, and by Thursday night she was without power again, after the power transmission line failure was announced. Another family member, in a middle class neighborhood, hasn't had power at all since the storm. Poles and light standards down everywhere and just pushed to the side to open the roads. Transformers laying smashed and open on the streets. Limited, and I mean limited, open schools. Gasoline was around $2.80 to 2.90 per gallon, available if the station had power. No portable generators available. All sold and in use. Trucked in power generators everywhere powering pump stations and other necessary buildings. The homes were a sea of "blue tarps" covering damaged roofs. One home we visited was 2 miles ( yes ... two miles ) from the river that overflowed it's banks, and still got 5 feet of water inside.
    Death toll stands at over 1000 ... which hasn't been mentioned. More then 100,000 people have left the island, mostly to places in the US.
    Hardly any US military presence and what we saw were Puerto Rico National Guard members on duty.
    Communication was sporadic, data transmission very limited. Cell service worked on AT&T, but other providers had non-existent service, or very little depending on location.
    All major roads open and cleared. The main highway roads were well maintained ( except in the inner city and impoverished areas ) and better then many here in the US.
    My blunt assessment.
    If Trump gave his administration a 10 out of 10 response to the hurricane effort, he is truly clueless.
    The people of P.R. are doing for themselves. With the Jones act back in place, it has restricted incoming goods and inflated the prices of what has hit the shores.
    It was a sad and humbling experience.
    When I gather more thoughts and upload a few pics, I will write and post more. Time to attend to home and wife now.
    Glad I am home. Sorry I couldn't help more.
    Glad you're home safe and sound. Thank you for the report.

    Sent from my SM-J327T using Tapatalk

  10. Likes fxstc07, fedexnuno Liked this post
  11. #38
    Taking A Stand!!!

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    Default Re: Amid Puerto Rico’s Water Crisis, Unions Step In Where Trump Is Failing

    Quote Originally Posted by fxstc07 View Post
    Yes, I am back.
    Tired and need some rest, but have piles of mail and bills to go over, plus the need to service the wife's car before she returns to work Monday.
    Bottom line, a quick assessment of what I saw and heard.

    Things are still horrible !
    My entire time staying at the Lutheran synod office and camp we had no electric. The water wasn't suitable to drink. Ice is in short supply and the lines are long, when available. Some areas didn't have any water and it's either trucked in, or in the mountain regions a pump and filtration device was set up. People had to travel to that one location for water. Bottled water is also in short supply. Food is available, but many restaurants are still closed and being cleaned and sanitized. Traffic lights only work in around 10% of the locations with far outlining areas not working at all. Traffic in the city is a nightmare with limited traffic control officers. ( I did see a N.J. State Trooper and his vehicle on one location ) Everyplace was packed that was open. Costco was nuts ! Check out lines exceeded 45 minutes to get to a register. Trucks lined up to deliver as fast as the stuff moved out the front door. No restrictions on what you can buy, but they had no bottled water either when I was there.
    The electric repair crews were few and far between. ( my guess is I counted less then 10 different repair crews working ) One relative of the Pastor's had electric Monday night when we did a quick visit, and by Thursday night she was without power again, after the power transmission line failure was announced. Another family member, in a middle class neighborhood, hasn't had power at all since the storm. Poles and light standards down everywhere and just pushed to the side to open the roads. Transformers laying smashed and open on the streets. Limited, and I mean limited, open schools. Gasoline was around $2.80 to 2.90 per gallon, available if the station had power. No portable generators available. All sold and in use. Trucked in power generators everywhere powering pump stations and other necessary buildings. The homes were a sea of "blue tarps" covering damaged roofs. One home we visited was 2 miles ( yes ... two miles ) from the river that overflowed it's banks, and still got 5 feet of water inside.
    Death toll stands at over 1000 ... which hasn't been mentioned. More then 100,000 people have left the island, mostly to places in the US.
    Hardly any US military presence and what we saw were Puerto Rico National Guard members on duty.
    Communication was sporadic, data transmission very limited. Cell service worked on AT&T, but other providers had non-existent service, or very little depending on location.
    All major roads open and cleared. The main highway roads were well maintained ( except in the inner city and impoverished areas ) and better then many here in the US.
    My blunt assessment.
    If Trump gave his administration a 10 out of 10 response to the hurricane effort, he is truly clueless.
    The people of P.R. are doing for themselves. With the Jones act back in place, it has restricted incoming goods and inflated the prices of what has hit the shores.
    It was a sad and humbling experience.
    When I gather more thoughts and upload a few pics, I will write and post more. Time to attend to home and wife now.
    Glad I am home. Sorry I couldn't help more.
    I somehow missed the post that you were going (until today). Wow, I have major respect for you (even more than before). Glad you are home safely and thank you for your service.

  12. Likes fxstc07, fedexnuno Liked this post
  13. #39
    Retired !

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    Default Re: Amid Puerto Rico’s Water Crisis, Unions Step In Where Trump Is Failing

    As I thought about my experience and the pictures I took, I really can't say much more then I wrote, but I will.
    Endless pictures of downed poles and wires mean nothing after you see the first one.
    Most light poles and electric poles are concrete or steel. Wood poles are there, but rare. Anyway, those heavy steel and concrete poles still snapped or were plain pushed over. Those giant mega light standards we see on major Interstate roads here, they had in and around San Juan area. Many were just pushed to the shoulder and laying there. The main highways, while not designated an "Interstate" were just like our roads. Three lanes each way, median in the center and protected on and off ramps. All cleared and traffic moving. I'll give credit there to the US military and Corp of Engineers. ( However they are leaving this week. All future work will be done by the Puerto Rico government. )
    Most, or a very large percentage of all buildings are made of concrete with steel reinforcements, except the very poor villages or very old areas.
    Those buildings held up well and suffered minor damage, mostly to windows and roofs and interior water damage. In other words, their processions were lost and appliances destroyed, while the electric within the homes probably suffered some damages too.
    One small church was literally made of 2 old steel shipping containers. One blew over, still attached to the frame and wheels, the other was mounted on block foundation and had multiple steel cables securing it to the ground. The total congregation was only 35 people, but it was their church and they held service for the first time last Sunday since the storm.
    They do know to build homes and buildings to withstand hurricanes. Windows and damage from falling trees and those large advertising signs caused more damage.
    The main airport in San Juan still had damage to smaller buildings and was not fully operational in all areas except the main concourse. Data and cell signals were the worst in the airport area for some reason.
    People stopped on the side of the roads near any cell towers attempting to get signals.
    We visited a neighborhood called "Levittown", which many of us east coasters know as a housing development in New Jersey, New York and a few others areas built by the same developer. They had a man made lake, basically a drainage area I think, but really large. They opened the flood gates without warning to the residents and many fled as waters overtook their homes and streets. One young lady we talked with lost her home and all possessions, with water rising to 15 feet, into her second floor. They found 8 of her neighbors dead a week later inside their house. She was the most gracious kid ever saying she lost everything, yet was still alive and still had a job and told us to reach out to others affected worst then her. Part of what makes people helping others greater then you can imagine. Link to the opening of the flood gates here: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/22/u...urricane-.html

    Let this sink in for a while. I may add more later. Friends and relatives just stopped by to visit.
    I am very thankful for what I have today and still wish I could do more for all those affected everywhere. Texas, Florida, the US Islands in the Caribbean, California ...

  14. Likes crazy, 222lifer, ABFwife Liked this post
  15. #40
    Retired !

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    Default Re: Amid Puerto Rico’s Water Crisis, Unions Step In Where Trump Is Failing

    I just thought of one of the last things I saw when we were on the way to the airport, leaving to come back home.
    I saw a Cadillac Escalade pass us. ( first one I saw on the Island )
    I noticed it more because it had a different license plate, blue in color, but I couldn't read what it said.
    However, the car got off the same exit we did so I got to see it up close. ( not the airport exit )
    Montana.

    Now I saw many different and some expensive cars there. I was told a new car in P.R. has around an extra 5 grand attached to the sticker for transportation due to the Jones act.
    Yet somebody from Montana had their car transported there, complete with their registration plates, to drive around.

    I wonder who that was ?

  16. Likes 222lifer Liked this post
 

 
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