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  1. #11
    Retired !

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    Default Re: After the Keystone XL Approval, Here’s What’s Next for the Climate Movement

    Seems the recent leak is much worst then they thought ... or wanted us to know ?

    Keystone pipeline spill now looks worse than previously thought
    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — A crude oil spill from the Keystone pipeline in eastern North Dakota has turned out to have affected almost 10 times the amount of land as first reported, a state regulator said Monday.
    North Dakota environmental scientist Bill Suess said the leak reported on Oct. 29 is now estimated by state regulators to have affected about 209,100 square feet (19,426 square meters) of land near Edinburg. State regulators had said the leak affected about 22,500 square feet (2,090 square meters) of land.
    Calgary, Alberta-based TC Energy, formerly known as TransCanada, estimated its pipeline leaked an estimated 383,000 gallons (1.4 million liters) of oil. Suess said that estimate has not changed.
    Crude began flowing through the $5.2 billion pipeline in 2011. It’s designed to carry crude oil across Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and through North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas and Missouri on the way to refineries in Patoka, Illinois and Cushing, Oklahoma. It can handle about 23 million gallons (87 million liters) daily.
    8 years old and already leaking. That's a great example of why this wasn't needed, or wanted.

    https://www.foxbusiness.com/energy/k...wp9o1ctBWN9RlE

  2. Likes ABFwife, 222lifer Liked this post
  3. #12
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    Default Re: After the Keystone XL Approval, Here’s What’s Next for the Climate Movement

    The saga of the Keystone XL pipeline continues.

    US judge cancels permit for Keystone XL pipeline from Canada
    A U.S. judge canceled a key permit Wednesday for the Keystone XL oil pipeline that’s expected to stretch from Canada to Nebraska, another setback for the disputed project that got underway less than two weeks ago following years of delays.
    Judge Brian Morris said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers failed to adequately consider effects on endangered species such as pallid sturgeon, a massive, dinosaur-like fish that lives in rivers the pipeline would cross.
    The ruling, however, does not shut down work that has begun at the U.S.-Canada border crossing in Montana, according to attorneys in the case. Pipeline sponsor TC Energy will need the permit for future construction across hundreds of rivers and streams along Keystone’s 1,200-mile (1,930-kilometer) route.
    The cancellation could have broader implications because it appears to invalidate dredging work for any project authorized under the 2017 permit, said attorney Jared Margolis with the Center for Biological Diversity, another plaintiff in the case. It’s unclear what projects would be included.
    Morris is holding a court hearing Thursday on two other lawsuits against the $8 billion pipeline. American Indian tribes and environmental groups want him to halt the construction at the border while a lawsuit challenging President Donald Trump’s approval of the pipeline last year works its way through the courts.
    Tribal leaders and some residents of rural communities along the pipeline’s route worry that thousands of workers needed for the project could spread the virus.
    https://apnews.com/89e3f21d344db86b8...wjVTzKag0_dKzk

  4. #13
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    Default Re: After the Keystone XL Approval, Here’s What’s Next for the Climate Movement

    And the legal battles continue. An appeals court left the last ruling in place on Thursday.

    Court ruling in Keystone XL case is another blow against big U.S. natgas pipes
    The two biggest U.S. natural gas pipelines under construction are likely facing more delays after an appeals court ruling against the Army Corps of Engineers, analysts say.
    The Trump Administration has aggressively pressed ahead with new pipeline construction, but several projects have run into roadblocks due to successful legal challenges charging that the administration is not applying careful regulatory scrutiny.

    Last month, a Montana judge ruled the Army Corps authorized permits to cross streams without properly consulting other federal agencies on endangered species. Rather than limit its ruling to the Keystone XL crude pipeline case before the court, the Montana judge questioned the Army Corps' method of authorizing stream crossing under the entire National Permit 12 program.
    The U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday left that ruling in place, which will prevent Keystone and other pipelines from using the Army Corps' stream-crossing permit program.
    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/court...162125728.html

  5. #14
    Taking A Stand!!!

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    Default Re: After the Keystone XL Approval, Here’s What’s Next for the Climate Movement

    Supreme Court Won’t Block Ruling to Halt Work on Keystone XL Pipeline

    This is dated July 6th 2020

    WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Monday rejected a request from the Trump administration to allow construction of parts of the Keystone XL oil pipeline that had been blocked by a federal judge in Montana. But the court temporarily revived a permit program that would let other oil and gas pipelines cross waterways after only modest scrutiny from regulators.

    The court’s brief, unsigned order gave no reasons, which is typical when the justices rule on emergency applications, and it said it would last while appeals moved forward. There were no noted dissents.

    Environmental groups had challenged the permit program, called for by the Clean Water Act, saying it posed a threat to endangered species. In April, Judge Brian M. Morris of the Federal District Court in Montana suspended the program, which is administered by the Army Corps of Engineers, saying that it had been improperly reauthorized in 2017.

    The government, he wrote, had violated the Endangered Species Act by failing to adequately consult with federal wildlife agencies.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/06/u...-pipeline.html

  6. #15
    Taking A Stand!!!

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    Default Re: After the Keystone XL Approval, Here’s What’s Next for the Climate Movement

    Thousands Of Albertans Get To Work On Keystone XL Pipeline

    This is dated July 7th 2020 so after posting the above post dated one day before this, I will admit I am totally confused! Is this thing a go or not???
    Almost 12 years after TC Energy first proposed the Keystone XL pipeline project, thousands of local workers, including engineers, welders, heavy equipment operators, labourers, teamsters, safety inspectors, Indigenous monitors, and other skilled tradespeople, are lacing up their work boots near Oyen and beginning construction on the Alberta spread of the 1,947-kilometre pipeline.

    The pipeline will allow up to 830,000 barrels per day of western Canadian crude oil to travel from Hardisty, Alberta to Steele City, Nebraska. Once the oil reaches Steele City it will connect with existing facilities to reach U.S. Gulf Coast refiners to meet critical needs for transportation fuel and other life-enhancing products.


    The government says Alberta’s $1.5 billion equity stake in Keystone XL will enhance and protect the value of the province’s natural resources, to the benefit of all Albertans.

    Premier Jason Kenney said, “After many years of stringent environmental review, collaboration with landowners, local officials and Indigenous groups and a dogged determination to never say die, this project – essential to our economic recovery – is well underway. Not only will Keystone XL create jobs when they are needed most, it will strengthen continental energy security and independence by ensuring that Canadian oil – developed under the world’s highest environmental, human rights, and labour standards – continues to be a dominant force in global supply.”
    https://strathmorenow.com/stories/th...ne-xl-pipeline

  7. Likes fxstc07 Liked this post
  8. #16
    Retired !

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    Default Re: After the Keystone XL Approval, Here’s What’s Next for the Climate Movement

    I know the Keystone pipeline is back in the news. This story could have went in the coronavirus thread, but it's here.
    Seems your not safe in Montana either. The virus is spreading everywhere.

    2 Keystone XL pipeline workers get virus, but work continues
    Two people working on the Keystone XL oil pipeline have tested positive for the coronavirus in northern Montana, but the company said Thursday that construction work on the disputed project will continue after a temporary shut down of a pipe storage yard.
    Calgary-based TC Energy says the first pipe yard worker in Phillips County tested positive at a local clinic on July 28, Yellowstone Public Radio reported. Testing on six close contacts of the infected person found a second worker with the virus.
    Native American tribes and others along the pipeline’s 1,200-mile (1,930-mile) route have raised concerns that workers could bring the virus into rural communities unable to handle a large outbreak.
    The company initially planned to build 11 camps housing up to 1,000 workers each along the pipeline’s route — six in Montana, four in South Dakota and one in Nebraska.
    Construction of most camps for now has been deferred because of the court ruling on river crossings, Cunha said, and it’s uncertain if all the camps will be built after the arrival of the pandemic.
    https://apnews.com/51b470d1bc241fb7ee24341bc80b5f0c

 

 
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