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  1. #1
    Taking A Stand!!!

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    ABF
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    Default NLRB 2020 Predictor: Itís Good to be an Employer

    Until we can get Trump out of the White House, nothing will change for the better.

    As not just a new year but a new decade begins, we know from the closing days of 2019 that the National Labor Relations Board is rolling back pro-employee/union rulings issued during the Obama era, and will likely continue to do so. Not only does the labor law landscape look remarkably different today than it did at the end of the Obama-era administration, so do many other federal agencies and policies.

    Throughout 2019, the NLRB reversed many previous administrations' decisions on labor-management relations and labor-law compliance. Current NLRB rule changes favor the interests of employers. These developments include election procedures, workplace rules, employer's email and computer usage, independent contractor standards, policies requiring employee confidentiality in workplace investigations, joint employer changes and more.

    What can we expect in 2020? The same thing, but more of it.
    https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/nl...o-be-an-35439/

  2. #2
    Retired !

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    Feb 2009
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    Retired - New Penn
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    Default Re: NLRB 2020 Predictor: Itís Good to be an Employer

    Another decision rendered by the NLRB which sides in favor of the employer. The Teamsters has said this decision will have a negative effect on working Americans.

    NLRB restores joint-employer standard in final rule
    Trucking companies are expected to benefit from a new federal rule aimed at more clearly defining what constitutes joint-employer relationships.
    The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) will issue the rule Wednesday, and it is expected to go into effect April 27, barring a court challenge.
    The final rule restores a standard for determining joint-employer status that had been applied for several decades before 2015, the NLRB stated in a news release, but with “greater precision, clarity, and detail.”
    For trucking companies, the ramifications of a joint-employer relationship would come up often in the case of strike situations, according to Jack Finklea, a labor law specialist at the law firm Scopelitis Garvin, Light, Hanson & Feary.
    The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, which pointed out that the 2015 NLRB decision known as Browning-Ferris, which the new rulemaking overrides, was a case involving the Teamsters.
    “We are deeply disappointed in this decision, which will have a negative and tangible impact on hard working Americans,” the union said in a statement to FreightWaves. “The [Browning-Ferris] ruling … protects millions of workers from manipulations by companies calculated to impair employee rights by playing shell games over what entity in fact controls their working conditions. Rolling it back will cause great harm.”
    https://www.freightwaves.com/news/nl...-in-final-rule

  3. #3
    Retired !

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    Retired - New Penn
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    Default Re: NLRB 2020 Predictor: Itís Good to be an Employer

    For a better understanding about post #2 and the NLRB decision, read this article.

    Labor board deals final blow to Obama-era effort to unionize fast-food industry
    The National Labor Relations Board, the main federal labor law enforcement agency, rolled back an Obama administration-era effort to help unions organize franchisor corporations such as McDonald's through the so-called joint employer rule, dealing a blow to organized labor.

    Joint employer referred to when two businesses were so tightly aligned that one could be said to be responsible for another's workplace policies. Prior to the Obama administration, this only applied if one business had "direct control" over another. During the Obama years, the much looser "indirect control" standard was adopted. Tuesday's announcement means the direct-control standard is the norm again.

    The seemingly minor rewrite to an obscure legal standard followed a coordinated push by labor unions such as the Service Employees International Union, which were seeking to organize the fast-food industry. Business trade groups mounted an equally fierce pushback to get the Trump administration to restore the pre-Obama standard. The Labor Department readopted the earlier standard last month. The NLRB followed suit Tuesday.
    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/p...-food-industry

 

 

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