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Thread: This Month in Union History

  1. #1
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    Default This Month in Union History

    At one time I thought I had such a thread here but I cannot find it so I am making a fresh start here. This comes off of a Union site I use each day and I thought it would be interesting to see what took place in union history. I will get us caught up for this month.

    1-01-1966

    1966 New York City transit strike

    In 1966, the Transport Workers Union (TWU) and Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) called a strike in New York City after the expiration of their contract with the New York City Transit Authority (TA). It was the first strike against the TA; pre-TWU transit strikes in 1905, 1910, 1916 and 1919 against the then-private transit companies had all failed. There had also been some partial TWU strikes in the 1930s, but no citywide actions.[1] The strike led to the passage of the Taylor Law, which redefined the rights and limitations of unions for public employees in New York.[2]

    The strikers were led initially by the Irish-born Michael J. "Mike" Quill, the TWU's founder, who had been the union's president since its founding. The strike effectively ended all service on the subway and buses in the city, affecting millions of commuters. It was an ominous beginning for the mayoralty of John V. Lindsay, but is perhaps better remembered for the jailing of Quill and for his death only weeks afterwards.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1966_N...transit_strike
    Last edited by ABFwife; 01-15-2019 at 08:37 AM.
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  2. #2
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    2-01-1920

    Thousands of US labor activists are arrested in the 'Palmer Raids' during the first Red Scare.


    The Palmer Raids were a series of raids conducted in November 1919 and January 1920 during the First Red Scare by the United States Department of Justice under the administration of President Woodrow Wilson to capture and arrest suspected radical leftists, mostly Italian and Eastern European immigrants and especially anarchists and communists, and deport them from the United States. The raids particularly targeted Italian immigrants and Eastern European Jewish immigrants with suspected radical leftist ties, with particular focus on Italian anarchists and immigrant leftist labor activists. The raids and arrests occurred under the leadership of Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer. Though more than 500 foreign citizens were deported, including a number of prominent leftist leaders, Palmer's efforts were largely frustrated by officials at the U.S. Department of Labor, which had authority for deportations and objected to Palmer's methods.

    The Palmer Raids occurred in the larger context of the Red Scare, the term given to fear of and reaction against communist radicals in the U.S. in the years immediately following World War I and the Russian Revolution.[1] There were strikes that garnered national attention, race riots in more than 30 cities, and two sets of bombings in April and June 1919, including one bomb mailed to Palmer's home. The Palmer Raids preceded the Immigration Act of 1924, which also targeted Southern European and Eastern Europe immigrants on not just political grounds but also mostly ethnic and racial grounds.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palmer...n_January_1920
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  3. #3
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    7-01-1920

    Five elected members of the New York state assembly belonging to the Socialist Party are refused their seats.

    Samuel Orr (July 11, 1890 – August 29, 1981) was a socialist politician from New York City best remembered for being one of the five elected members of the Socialist Party of America expelled by the New York State Assembly during the First Red Scare in 1920.[1]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Orr
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  4. #4
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    11-01-1912

    The 'Bread and Roses' strike began in Lynn Massachusetts. The strike was begun and led by mainly immigrant women
    In early 1912, in the textile manufacturing centre of Lawrence, Massachusetts, over 20,000 workers walked out of the mills to protest a rollback in their already meagre pay. When the work week was reduced by law from 56 to 54 hours a week, the textile bosses cut back the workers’ wages to match. The massive walk-out, organized by the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), became known as the “Three Loaves Strike,” referring to what could be bought for the amount that wages were being cut, “The Singing Strike” because the songs of the IWW were being heard everywhere, and “The Bread and Roses Strike” because young women workers carried a banner with the slogan “We want bread and roses too.” The strike was begun and led by mainly immigrant women, creating unity and solidarity across ethnic, religious and cultural lines.


    The strike lasted from the 11th of January to March 14th. Facing police and strikebreakers, the strikers bravely held on until their demands for better wages and working conditions were met. They were drenched with icy water from fire hoses; mothers and children were beaten and clubbed; a pregnant woman was beaten so badly, she miscarried and another woman, Anna LoPizzo, was shot by the police.
    https://www.cupw.ca/en/campaign/reso...es-strike-rose
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  5. #5
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    11-01-1937

    Police beat and arrest UAW members during the great sit-down strike in Flint, Michigan
    On this day in 1937, nearly two weeks into a sit-down strike by General Motors (GM) auto workers at the Fisher Body Plant No. 2 in Flint, Michigan, a riot breaks out when police try to prevent the strikers from receiving food deliveries from supporters on the outside. Strikers and police officers alike were injured in the melee, which was later nicknamed the “Battle of the Running Bulls.” After the January 11 riot, Michigan governor Frank Murphy called in the National Guard to surround the plant. However, the governor, who wanted to preserve his reputation as a friend to the workingman, decided against ordering troops into the plant.

    The strike was organized by the United Auto Workers (UAW) union, which wanted GM–then the world’s largest automaker–to recognize it as the sole bargaining authority for employees at the company’s factories. The fledgling UAW, which was founded in 1935, also demanded improved working conditions and job security for GM’s employees. (In addition to the Fisher Body Plant No. 2, workers at other GM plants in Michigan and around the country went on strike during late 1936-early 1937.) Many Americans sympathized with the strikers, and President Franklin Roosevelt was involved with negotiations to end the conflict.
    https://www.history.com/this-day-in-...m-plant-strike
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  6. #6
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    13-01-1874

    Mounted police from the NYPD violently attack a demonstration of unemployed workers in Tompkins Square Park

    The Tompkins Square Park riot occurred on January 13, 1874 when the New York City Police Department clashed with a demonstration involving thousands of unemployed civilians in New York City's Tompkins Square Park, located in what is today called the East Village.[1]
    The riot occurred in the midst of the Panic of 1873, a depression that began in 1873 and lasted for several years.[2] Workers movements throughout the United States had been making demands of the government to help ease the strain of the depression.[3] Organizations rejected offers of charity and instead asked for public works programs that would provide jobs for the masses of unemployed.[4] Formed in December 1873, The Committee of Safety in New York City tried to organize a meeting with city officials but was denied any such opportunity.[3]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tompki...re_riot_(1874)
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  7. #7
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    15-01-1929

    Birth of civil rights activist and labor movement supporter Martin Luther King, Jr
    Martin Luther King Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the civil rights movement from 1954 until his death in 1968. Born in Atlanta, King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, tactics his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi helped inspire.

    King led the 1955 Montgomery bus boycott and in 1957 became the first president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). With the SCLC, he led an unsuccessful 1962 struggle against segregation in Albany, Georgia, and helped organize the nonviolent 1963 protests in Birmingham, Alabama. He also helped organize the 1963 March on Washington, where he delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech.

    On October 14, 1964, King won the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolent resistance.[1] In 1965, he helped organize the Selma to Montgomery marches. The following year, he and the SCLC took the movement north to Chicago to work on segregated housing. In his final years, he expanded his focus to include opposition towards poverty and the Vietnam War. He alienated many of his liberal allies with a 1967 speech titled "Beyond Vietnam". J. Edgar Hoover considered him a radical and made him an object of the FBI's COINTELPRO from 1963 on. FBI agents investigated him for possible communist ties, recorded his extramarital liaisons and reported on them to government officials, and on one occasion mailed King a threatening anonymous letter, which he interpreted as an attempt to make him commit suicide.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Luther_King_Jr.
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  8. #8
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    Default Re: This Month in Union History

    Fell behind on this. Actually the source that I use for this thread appears to have issues I cannot resolve so unfortunately this is not going to go anywhere.

 

 

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