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  1. #21
    Getting In The Groove Now.

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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    Whose surprised here? You shouldn't be, as always half the workforce didn't bother to participate and vote, and what is the union thinking trying to start this in the South of all places for christsake, the dimwitted south. Maybe New York, New Jersey, Philly area, upper industrial mid west, maybe be smart enough to try in an area you actually might have a chance to win in. DUH

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  3. #22
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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    Quote Originally Posted by Yankee View Post
    Whose surprised here? You shouldn't be, as always half the workforce didn't bother to participate and vote, and what is the union thinking trying to start this in the South of all places for christsake, the dimwitted south. Maybe New York, New Jersey, Philly area, upper industrial mid west, maybe be smart enough to try in an area you actually might have a chance to win in. DUH
    The dimwitted south... sounds like you're doing a little pigeonholing.

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  5. #23
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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    Union Accuses Amazon Of Illegally Sabotaging Alabama Vote

    Amazon said in a statement acknowledging the company's landslide win in the NLRB union vote in Bessemer, Ala. earlier this month that it didn't "intimidate" voters to secure its victory. Days later, outgoing CEO Jeff Bezos (who will likely control Amazon from the boardroom for years or decades to come) proclaimed in a letter to shareholders that he would strive to transform Amazon into a workers paradise (more specifically, he promised to remake Amazon into "Earth's Best Eployer and Earth's Safest Place To Work." Following the stunning defeat in this month's unionization vote at Amazon's fulfillment center in Bessemer, While we suspect many Amazon workers would settle for just a little more leniency to use the bathroom during their shifts without requiring the use of bottles, it looks like the fledgling union in Bessemer is already planning to push back after the massive defeat, alleging a wide-ranging conspiracy by Amazon to sabotage the vote. Of the 3,215 ballots cast, there were 1,798 votes opposing the union and 738 in favor.

    After months of accusing Amazon of fighting dirty, the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union at BHM1 in Bessemer has filed an official complaint with the National Labor Relations Board claiming Amazon violated numerous NLRB rules and prevented a "free and fair" union election. In the filing, which was leaked to Wired ahead of time, the union outlined 23 objections to Amazon’s conduct, arguing that the company "prevented a free and uncoerced exercise of choice by the employees." Eight of the objections concern the collection box Amazon installed in the warehouse parking lot to collect ballots for the election. The RWDSU argues in the filiing that the collection box violated the procedural rules because the board never authorized the box and had denied Amazon’s request for one inside the warehouse. Meanwhile, the collection box was set up in a way that, the union alleges, created the impression that Amazon, not the NLRB, had control over the election and constituted improper voter surveillance. The other claims included in the complaint describe a coordinated campaign to allegedly coerce, frighten and intimidate workers into voting against the union.

    The union’s 15 other claims outline a campaign to allegedly coerce, frighten, and intimidate workers into voting against the union. The RWDSU accuses Amazon’s “agents” of unlawfully threatening employees with the loss of their benefits and pay if the union won and warning that the facility might close altogether. The union claims Amazon stifled the right to free discussion by booting workers out of employee meetings for questioning anti-union talking points, selectively enforced social distancing rules against believed union supporters, and interfered with employees’ ability to talk to the union by pressuring local officials to change policies governing how workers exited the warehouse and change the timing of a nearby traffic light. The union accuses Amazon of creating “an atmosphere of coercion and intimidation” by hiring uniformed off-duty police officers to patrol the parking lot, watching employees and organizers. One claim cites an email Amazon supposedly sent workers, saying they’d have to lay off 75 percent of the proposed unit because of the union.
    If the board rules in favor of the union, it could render the outcome irrelevant, despite Amazon's crushing victory. The most likely outcome would be a "do-over", according to Wired. But the board could also compel Amazon to bargain directly with the union. Many unions choose not to even bother with NLRB elections, believing that holding an election against well-funded management (that also signs would-be voters' paychecks) is like playing with a stacked deck. Wired seemed to suggest Amazon workers try the strategy of "recognition strikes", which have been used by the Teamsters and others before. It means striking until an employer agrees to recognize a union that has majority support within the shop.

    Wired also pointed out that Democrats in Congress are quickly moving to help strengthen unions, traditionally a cornerstone constituency of the Democratic base. The Protecting the Right to Organize Act passed the House in March. It includes several provisions that would level the playing field, including a ban on captive audience meetings - often used by employers to denigrate unions. Unfortunately for Amazon workers in Bessemer, and elsewhere in the US, Senate support currently falls well short of the 60 votes needed to get around the filibuster.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/technology...oard-complaint

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  7. #24
    I Am Rocking Now

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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    Quote Originally Posted by Docker View Post
    Union Accuses Amazon Of Illegally Sabotaging Alabama Vote

    Amazon said in a statement acknowledging the company's landslide win in the NLRB union vote in Bessemer, Ala. earlier this month that it didn't "intimidate" voters to secure its victory. Days later, outgoing CEO Jeff Bezos (who will likely control Amazon from the boardroom for years or decades to come) proclaimed in a letter to shareholders that he would strive to transform Amazon into a workers paradise (more specifically, he promised to remake Amazon into "Earth's Best Eployer and Earth's Safest Place To Work." Following the stunning defeat in this month's unionization vote at Amazon's fulfillment center in Bessemer, While we suspect many Amazon workers would settle for just a little more leniency to use the bathroom during their shifts without requiring the use of bottles, it looks like the fledgling union in Bessemer is already planning to push back after the massive defeat, alleging a wide-ranging conspiracy by Amazon to sabotage the vote. Of the 3,215 ballots cast, there were 1,798 votes opposing the union and 738 in favor.

    After months of accusing Amazon of fighting dirty, the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union at BHM1 in Bessemer has filed an official complaint with the National Labor Relations Board claiming Amazon violated numerous NLRB rules and prevented a "free and fair" union election. In the filing, which was leaked to Wired ahead of time, the union outlined 23 objections to Amazon’s conduct, arguing that the company "prevented a free and uncoerced exercise of choice by the employees." Eight of the objections concern the collection box Amazon installed in the warehouse parking lot to collect ballots for the election. The RWDSU argues in the filiing that the collection box violated the procedural rules because the board never authorized the box and had denied Amazon’s request for one inside the warehouse. Meanwhile, the collection box was set up in a way that, the union alleges, created the impression that Amazon, not the NLRB, had control over the election and constituted improper voter surveillance. The other claims included in the complaint describe a coordinated campaign to allegedly coerce, frighten and intimidate workers into voting against the union.



    If the board rules in favor of the union, it could render the outcome irrelevant, despite Amazon's crushing victory. The most likely outcome would be a "do-over", according to Wired. But the board could also compel Amazon to bargain directly with the union. Many unions choose not to even bother with NLRB elections, believing that holding an election against well-funded management (that also signs would-be voters' paychecks) is like playing with a stacked deck. Wired seemed to suggest Amazon workers try the strategy of "recognition strikes", which have been used by the Teamsters and others before. It means striking until an employer agrees to recognize a union that has majority support within the shop.

    Wired also pointed out that Democrats in Congress are quickly moving to help strengthen unions, traditionally a cornerstone constituency of the Democratic base. The Protecting the Right to Organize Act passed the House in March. It includes several provisions that would level the playing field, including a ban on captive audience meetings - often used by employers to denigrate unions. Unfortunately for Amazon workers in Bessemer, and elsewhere in the US, Senate support currently falls well short of the 60 votes needed to get around the filibuster.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/technology...oard-complaint
    Being he is already saying he wants to make it a better workplace for all the Amazon employees is sort of a victory for the union.. Without the pressure of the union it would be status quo .. The beatings would continue..

  8. #25
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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    Quote Originally Posted by crazy View Post
    Being he is already saying he wants to make it a better workplace for all the Amazon employees is sort of a victory for the union.. Without the pressure of the union it would be status quo .. The beatings would continue..
    Seems like a never ending saga with the lawyers being the only winners.

  9. #26
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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    Quote Originally Posted by 1484-1075 View Post
    Seems like a never ending saga with the lawyers being the only winners.
    It is like feeding their own being most politicians are lawyers to start with..

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  11. #27
    Old School... and proud!!

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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    Amazon Access to Mailbox Could Be Grounds to Overturn Union Vote

    Testimony that Amazon.com Inc. had access to a mailbox installed for workers to vote in a recent union election could prompt the National Labor Relations Board to overturn the results, according to the agency’s former chair. During an NLRB hearing on Friday, employee Kevin Jackson said Amazon security guards used keys to open the mailbox, which was located near the entrance of the facility in Bessemer, Alabama. The Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, which lost the election last month, has accused Amazon of having the mailbox installed so it could spy on workers. Even just the impression of election surveillance by an employer can influence the vote’s outcome, so the hearing is focusing largely on what workers witnessed during the election. If the board finds Jackson’s testimony credible, it should be reason enough to overturn the result, said Wilma Liebman, who chaired the NLRB under President Barack Obama. What Jackson is alleging “at a minimum creates an appearance of Amazon involvement -- if not an inference of actual tampering -- with ballots,” Liebman said via email Friday.

    Amazon has denied an ulterior motive, saying it asked the U.S. Postal Service to install the mailbox in a bid to boost turnout. “As we’ve said from the start, this mailbox was secure and Amazon had no access to outgoing mail,” a company spokeswoman said Friday. “Similar to any other mailbox that serves businesses, we had access only to the incoming mailbox where we received mail addressed to the building. The facts will become clear when we have a chance to present them next week.” Jackson testified that as he was leaving work one morning he saw security guards approach the mailbox and then watched one of them open a large box on the bottom labeled “1P.” “What he was getting out or looking for, I’m not sure,” he said. While it was dark at the time, Jackson said his headlights illuminated the area. He also testified that Amazon security guards used surveillance cameras to monitor the parking lot, including zooming in on particular cars to read license plates and see who was inside if they detected anything suspicious. Under long-standing precedent, NLRB elections are supposed to be held under “laboratory conditions,” in which “employees are able to exercise free and uncoerced choice” about unionization, Liebman said. “This conduct certainly departs from that.”

    “What legitimate purpose could there possibly be for Amazon security guards to be opening the box?” she asked. In an April 16 complaint, the union accused Amazon of misconduct -- including issuing anti-union threats, firing an employee for distributing union cards and pressuring workers to use the mailbox to cast their votes. Amazon workers have been testifying all week about the mailbox and how the company encouraged them to use it as a secure way to submit their ballots. A labor board hearing officer who will recommend a ruling on the matter asked Jackson several questions about what he saw, indicating she deemed his testimony potentially relevant to the case. Like other Amazon employees who testified this week, Jackson said he was approached by managers asking him if he received a ballot and whether he voted. One Amazon manager, whose name Jackson didn’t know, asked him “off the record” what he felt about the union campaign. Jackson said he responded by quoting scripture. The manager, Jackson said, told him, “That’s not the answer I was looking for,” and asked him again. Jackson said he repeated the same Bible verse. “She was frustrated with my answer and walked off,” he said.

    Jackson, who was recently hospitalized for an undisclosed health condition, testified via video conference while lying down. Amazon attorneys asked if he was taking any medication that would affect his memory and he responded that he wasn’t. Amazon employees voted 1,798 to 738 against joining the union, with 505 other disputed ballots uncounted. The labor board has the authority to invalidate election results in response to conduct that could have changed the outcome and prevented employees from making a free choice about whether to unionize. “This damning eyewitness testimony of an Amazon security guard opening the famous mailbox (to which the company insisted only USPS had keys) comes as no surprise,” said Representative Andy Levin, Democrat of Michigan. “But the worker’s riveting account of a supervisor asking him ‘off the record’ (right!) whether he was for the union is just as important. As I have suspected since my first visit to Bessemer, Amazon broke the law, and the NLRB will likely come to that conclusion.”

    https://www.newsmax.com/politics/cos...14/id/1021467/

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  13. #28
    I Am Rocking Now

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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    Quote Originally Posted by Docker View Post
    Amazon Access to Mailbox Could Be Grounds to Overturn Union Vote

    Testimony that Amazon.com Inc. had access to a mailbox installed for workers to vote in a recent union election could prompt the National Labor Relations Board to overturn the results, according to the agency’s former chair. During an NLRB hearing on Friday, employee Kevin Jackson said Amazon security guards used keys to open the mailbox, which was located near the entrance of the facility in Bessemer, Alabama. The Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, which lost the election last month, has accused Amazon of having the mailbox installed so it could spy on workers. Even just the impression of election surveillance by an employer can influence the vote’s outcome, so the hearing is focusing largely on what workers witnessed during the election. If the board finds Jackson’s testimony credible, it should be reason enough to overturn the result, said Wilma Liebman, who chaired the NLRB under President Barack Obama. What Jackson is alleging “at a minimum creates an appearance of Amazon involvement -- if not an inference of actual tampering -- with ballots,” Liebman said via email Friday.

    Amazon has denied an ulterior motive, saying it asked the U.S. Postal Service to install the mailbox in a bid to boost turnout. “As we’ve said from the start, this mailbox was secure and Amazon had no access to outgoing mail,” a company spokeswoman said Friday. “Similar to any other mailbox that serves businesses, we had access only to the incoming mailbox where we received mail addressed to the building. The facts will become clear when we have a chance to present them next week.” Jackson testified that as he was leaving work one morning he saw security guards approach the mailbox and then watched one of them open a large box on the bottom labeled “1P.” “What he was getting out or looking for, I’m not sure,” he said. While it was dark at the time, Jackson said his headlights illuminated the area. He also testified that Amazon security guards used surveillance cameras to monitor the parking lot, including zooming in on particular cars to read license plates and see who was inside if they detected anything suspicious. Under long-standing precedent, NLRB elections are supposed to be held under “laboratory conditions,” in which “employees are able to exercise free and uncoerced choice” about unionization, Liebman said. “This conduct certainly departs from that.”

    “What legitimate purpose could there possibly be for Amazon security guards to be opening the box?” she asked. In an April 16 complaint, the union accused Amazon of misconduct -- including issuing anti-union threats, firing an employee for distributing union cards and pressuring workers to use the mailbox to cast their votes. Amazon workers have been testifying all week about the mailbox and how the company encouraged them to use it as a secure way to submit their ballots. A labor board hearing officer who will recommend a ruling on the matter asked Jackson several questions about what he saw, indicating she deemed his testimony potentially relevant to the case. Like other Amazon employees who testified this week, Jackson said he was approached by managers asking him if he received a ballot and whether he voted. One Amazon manager, whose name Jackson didn’t know, asked him “off the record” what he felt about the union campaign. Jackson said he responded by quoting scripture. The manager, Jackson said, told him, “That’s not the answer I was looking for,” and asked him again. Jackson said he repeated the same Bible verse. “She was frustrated with my answer and walked off,” he said.

    Jackson, who was recently hospitalized for an undisclosed health condition, testified via video conference while lying down. Amazon attorneys asked if he was taking any medication that would affect his memory and he responded that he wasn’t. Amazon employees voted 1,798 to 738 against joining the union, with 505 other disputed ballots uncounted. The labor board has the authority to invalidate election results in response to conduct that could have changed the outcome and prevented employees from making a free choice about whether to unionize. “This damning eyewitness testimony of an Amazon security guard opening the famous mailbox (to which the company insisted only USPS had keys) comes as no surprise,” said Representative Andy Levin, Democrat of Michigan. “But the worker’s riveting account of a supervisor asking him ‘off the record’ (right!) whether he was for the union is just as important. As I have suspected since my first visit to Bessemer, Amazon broke the law, and the NLRB will likely come to that conclusion.”

    https://www.newsmax.com/politics/cos...14/id/1021467/
    Having a US postal mail box on the property?? I have no problem with that.. Having Amazon's security people opening the mail box?? Now there is a "federal" crime and they should be prosecuted for it if this is true.. I would have to say that somewhere there are videos of this..

  14. #29
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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    Corporations like Amazon pay big bucks for "union avoidance" — and it all happens in the dark

    An Amazon-sponsored billboard urging employees to return their unionization ballots is seen on March 28, 2021, in Bessemer, Alabama. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

    Over the past year, we've seen Amazon, the e-commerce Goliath which employs 1.3 million people (roughly equivalent to the entire population of Dallas), launch one of the most aggressive anti-union campaigns in modern corporate history, successfully quashing a months-long employee-led organizing effort at a company warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama.
    That saga began early in 2021, when Amazon learned that its 5,800 warehouse workers in Bessemer were considering a contract with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union. That prompting the company to roll out a series of union-busting tactics that varied in effectiveness and sophistication.

    Amazon inundated its Alabama employees with sometimes-confrontational text messages and posters preaching the ills of unions, and forced them to attend "captive audience" meetings, where representatives delivered sober lectures on the downside of an organizing drive. In some cases, workers were compelled to have to one-on-one sitdowns with managers, where they'd be cajoled into voting against the effort. Amazon even coordinated with Bessemer city officials to change a traffic signal so union organizers couldn't get too close to the warehouse.

    It worked. In April, after months of political buildup, Amazon's Bessemer workforce overwhelmingly voted against forming a union. Labor activists accused the company of coercive tactics designed to scare its workers into submission, but many of them didn't mention — and perhaps didn't even realize — that Amazon management didn't come up with that strategy all on its own. Hardly anyone discussed the role of Morgan Lewis, the "union avoidance" law firm that almost certainly designed and directed a detailed plan to defeat the organizing drive in Alabama.

    We don't know for certain what role Morgan Lewis played, because everything about the union-avoidance business happens in the dark, and firms like Morgan remain almost invisible to the public and the mainstream press. They are believed in legal and business circles to wield immense influence in union-busting campaigns — but there's not much reliable public information by which to gauge the scope of that influence, or to put a price tag on these firms' campaigns.

    According to a 2019 estimate by the Economic Policy Institute (EPI), U.S. employers spend nearly $340 million per year on union avoidance services. The EPI also found that by the early 2000s, about 75% of all employers facing union elections involving 50 or more voters retained a union avoidance consultant. It appears there are four big law firms that dominate the business: Littler Mendelson, Ogletree Deakins, Jackson Lewis and Fisher Phillips.

    Firms like these specialize in delivering advice to their client companies employers on how to extinguish union efforts and push the envelope of labor law without violating it, says Catherine Fisk, a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley.

    "There are these fine distinctions in what can be said and not be said" when it comes to employers discouraging employees from joining a union, Fisk told Salon. "The law has essentially incentivized companies to walk right up to the line of threatening their workforce."

    Employers "pay lawyers a great deal of money to tell them how to threaten without 'threatening,' coerce without 'coercing' and, above all, make sure that employees only hear one side of the story," she explained.

    In recent years, labor advocates have railed against many of the questionable practices involved in "union avoidance," in which employers observe the letter of labor law while coming right to the edge of outright "coercion," a practice forbidden by the National Labor Relations Act.

    One such method involves the "captive audience" meetings mentioned above, where employers force workers to attend mandatory "informational" sessions designed to dissuade them from unionizing. (Since such meetings occur on the clock and workers are paid their normal wage to attend, they don't violate labor laws.) Virtually all such meetings take place in private without union representatives present, and in some cases can leave workers feeling threatened.

    Michael J. Lotito, co-chair of Littler Mendelson's Workplace Policy Institute, told Salon that such meetings can fairly be considered "informational," because sometimes "the union has not provided the individuals with a copy of its constitution."

    Worker testimonies have suggested a markedly different story.

    Read more
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/othe...?ocid=msedgntp

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  16. #30
    Old School... and proud!!

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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    Amazon's new union battle: Teamsters go local to snarl expansion

    SAN FRANCISCO, Sept 1 (Reuters) - In June, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, one of the nation’s largest and most influential unions, vowed to make organizing the Amazon. com Inc (AMZN. O) workforce a top priority. Two months later, details of the Teamsters’ ground game are starting to take shape, Reuters has learned from interviews with local union leaders. While organizing workers is the ultimate aim, the short-term strategy is one of disruption.Over the past year, the Teamsters have raised concerns about Amazon at local government meetings in at least nine communities, leading to the scrapping of projects and the rejection of a tax break, as well as resolutions calling on the company to meet local labor standards, according to a Reuters tally.

    From Fort Wayne, Indiana, to Oceanside, California, the Teamsters are popping up in city halls around the country, joining forces with community groups as they seek to persuade local officials to ask more of the tech giant or reject its expansion plans outright. They are training members at logistics companies on how to talk to Amazon drivers about the benefits of unionizing. In New York, the Teamsters weighed in on an antitrust bill passed by the state senate that would make it easier for regulators to pursue companies for anticompetitive conduct, and they have also backed antitrust bills in the U. S. House of Representatives. Taken together, these early moves show the Teamsters are tapping into their network of more than 1 million members to take on Amazon at the local level. The escalating push suggests that while Amazon earlier this year fended off an attempt by the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union to organize workers in Bessemer, Alabama, the fight with organized labor has only just begun, and it is being waged across the country. Amazon did not respond to a request for comment.

    The Teamsters are playing the long game, showing that while organizing Amazon workers is a long-term project, they can keep the company on its toes by challenging expansion plans in the meantime. Most Amazon facilities „have to be built in a particular area for operational needs,” Randy Korgan, the Teamsters’ national director for Amazon, said in an interview. „Why would any community give anything away?” Rather than holding votes supervised by the National Labor Relations Board, as the RWDSU did in Bessemer, the Teamsters have indicated they will seek to ratchet up pressure on Amazon through tactics such as community demonstrations, strikes and boycotts until the e-commerce giant is forced to deal with them.

    GROUND GAME

    With its vast, high-churn workforce, Amazon is viewed as one of organized labor’s toughest targets, and nixing a proposed warehouse is a far cry from organizing a workforce. The United Food and Commercial Workers International Union, for example, have fought Walmart Inc's (WMT. N) expansion for years using similar tactics, but have yet to bring U. S. workers into the fold. Still, local forums such as town halls and planning commission meetings are a good place to start, said Pat Garofalo, director of state and local policy at the American Economic Liberties Project, a nonprofit. “You have to reduce (Amazon’s) ability to get their way at the same time as you are building up workers’ ability to make demands,” he said. As one of America’s largest unions, the Teamsters are well-funded, though their finances are decentralized, with money often concentrated in the hands of powerful local branches, said John Logan, a labor professor at San Francisco State University. That makes achieving local buy-in essential, though Logan does not think the Teamsters will have trouble uniting around the cause of Amazon. Southern California, which is both an Amazon logistics hub and a place where unions enjoy strong support, has emerged as a key battleground. To speak out about a proposed Amazon facility in the San Diego suburb of El Cajon, the Teamsters knocked on the doors of some 700 neighboring homes and attended county meetings.

    The union followed a similar playbook in Oceanside, California, inviting community members to sign “commitment cards” to stay engaged about an Amazon development. In August, the city council rejected the project. The Teamsters are also closing ranks around Amazon in Massachusetts. In Boston and 11 surrounding municipalities, local leaders have passed nonbinding resolutions drafted by Teamsters Local 25 that urge Amazon to uphold local labor standards and meet with unions and community groups as it expands, according to Local 25.

    In pushing the resolution, the Teamsters targeted municipalities close to highways and airports, seeking to hit Amazon where it hurts, said Sean O’Brien, president of Local 25. 'Amazon is not happy about it,' O'Brien said. Whether the Teamsters can slow the pace of Amazon’s growth long-term is unclear, but one thing is certain: the fight will require stamina. In June, the city council of Arvada, Colorado, voted down a proposed Amazon delivery center after Teamsters business agent Dan Murphy and other community members spoke out against the project, citing concerns including traffic, safety and labor conditions. Weeks after the vote, Murphy heard rumblings of another Amazon project that could be under way an hour to the north.

    https://www.reuters.com/world/us/ama...on-2021-09-01/

    Amazon says it’s looking to hire 55,000 people

    Amazon is going on another hiring spree.The company said Wednesday that it plans to hire 55,000 people around the world, with about 40,000 of those roles in the U.S. Amazon said all the open roles are for tech jobs and corporate positions. Separately, the company has been hiring thousands of warehouse workers to pack and ship online orders.

    While other companies laid off workers during the pandemic, Amazon's workforce has ballooned as more people stayed home and ordered toilet paper and groceries from the shopping site. Last year alone, it hired 500,000 people.Amazon currently employs more than 1.3 million worldwide, making it the second-largest private U.S. employer after retail rival Walmart, which is also ramping up hiring. The company said Wednesday it planned to hire 20,000 people at its Walmart and Sam's Club warehouses to fill online orders to drive lifts.

    Like Walmart before it, Amazon continues to face pressure on how it treats its workers. A union push at an Amazon warehouse in Alabama failed earlier this year, but other unions and advocates still have the company in its sights. The Teamsters, one of the country’s largest unions, said in June that it would step up its efforts to unionize Amazon workers, saying that the company exploits employees by paying them low wages, pushes them to work at fast speeds and offers no job security. Amazon said Wednesday the large number of job openings is due its growing businesses, including its cloud computing unit and its project to send satellites into space to beam internet service to earth.The Seattle-based company said the open U.S. jobs are spread across 220 Amazon locations around the country.

    https://www.sacbee.com/news/business...253914918.html

 

 
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