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  1. #1141
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Tuesday, June 22, the 173rd day of 2021. There are 192 days left in the year.

    In 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, more popularly known as the “GI Bill of Rights.”

    In 1977, John N. Mitchell became the first former U.S. Attorney General to go to prison as he began serving a sentence for his role in the Watergate cover-up.

    Dennis Hastert arrived at a Minnesota prison to serve his 15-month sentence in a hush-money case involving revelations that the former House speaker had sexually abused at least four boys when he coached wrestling at an Illinois high school.
    Today in labor history.

    1918 – A total of 86 passengers on a train carrying members of the Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus are killed, another 127 injured in a wreck near Hammond, Ind. Five days later the dead are buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in Forest Park, Ill., in an area set aside as Showmen’s Rest, purchased only a few months earlier by the Showmen’s League of America.

    1922 – Violence erupted during a coal mine strike at Herrin, Ill. A total of 36 were killed, 21 of them non-union miners.
    Thought for today. “Never concede to evil…. When we concede to evil, even in a small way, we feed it, and it grows stronger.” ― Dave Wolverton

    https://wtop.com/back-in-the-day/202...n-history-276/

    https://labortribune.com/this-week-i...ry-june-21-27/

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  3. #1142
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Wednesday, June 23, the 174th day of 2021. There are 191 days left in the year.

    On June 23, 1972, President Richard Nixon signed Title IX barring discrimination on the basis of sex for “any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.” (On the same day, Nixon and White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman discussed using the CIA to obstruct the FBI’s Watergate investigation. Revelation of the tape recording of this conversation sparked Nixon’s resignation in 1974.)

    In 1988, James E. Hansen, a climatologist at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, told a Senate panel that global warming of the earth caused by the “greenhouse effect” was a reality.

    Ten years ago: Republicans pulled out of debt-reduction talks led by Vice President Joe Biden, blaming Democrats for demanding tax increases as part of a deal rather than accepting more than $1 trillion in cuts to Medicare and other government programs.
    Today in labor history.

    1947 – Congress overrides President Harry Truman’s veto of the anti-worker Taft-Hartley Act. The law weakened unions and let states exempt themselves from union requirements. Twenty states immediately enacted open shop laws and more followed.

    1978 – OSHA issues standard on cotton dust to protect 600,000 workers from byssinosis, also known as “brown lung.”

    1999 – A majority of the 5,000 textile workers at six Fieldcrest Cannon textile plants in Kannapolis, N.C., vote for union representation after an historic 25-year fight.
    Thought for today. “Stay away from conflictive, negative people that pull you down, because they contaminate your energy and impede your progress. Search for people who look at the world with optimism, that inspire you, make you happy and provide peace of mind.” ― Pablo

    https://wtop.com/back-in-the-day/202...n-history-275/

    https://labortribune.com/this-week-i...ry-june-21-27/

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  5. #1143
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Thursday, June 24, the 175th day of 2021. There are 190 days left in the year.

    In 1983, the space shuttle Challenger — carrying America’s first woman in space, Sally K. Ride — coasted to a safe landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California.

    In 2015, Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley became the first southern governor to use his executive power to remove Confederate banners, as four flags with secessionist symbols were taken down from a large monument to rebel soldiers outside the state capitol in Montgomery.

    In 2018, women in Saudi Arabia were able to drive for the first time, as the world’s last remaining ban on female drivers was lifted.
    Today in labor history.

    1880 – Birth of Agnes Nestor, president of the Int’l Glove Workers Union and longtime leader of the Chicago Women’s Trade Union League. She began work in a glove factory at age 14.

    1971 – Seventeen workers are killed as methane explodes in a water tunnel under construction in Sylmar, Calif.
    Thought for today. "Freedom is meaningless if people cannot put food in their stomachs, if they can have no shelter, if illiteracy and disease continue to dog them." - Nelson Mandela

    https://wtop.com/back-in-the-day/202...n-history-274/

    https://labortribune.com/this-week-i...ry-june-21-27/

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  7. #1144
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Friday, June 25, the 176th day of 2021. There are 189 days left in the year.

    In 1876, Lt. Col. Colonel George A. Custer and his 7th Cavalry were wiped out by Sioux and Cheyenne Indians in the Battle of the Little Bighorn in Montana.

    In 1947, “The Diary of a Young Girl,” the personal journal of Anne Frank, a German-born Jewish girl hiding with her family from the Nazis in Amsterdam during World War II, was first published.

    In 1973, former White House Counsel John W. Dean began testifying before the Senate Watergate Committee, implicating top administration officials, including President Richard Nixon as well as himself, in the Watergate scandal and cover-up.
    Today in labor history.

    1938 – Fair Labor Standards Act passes Congress, banning child labor and setting the 40-hour work week.

    1941 – At the urging of Black Labor and civil rights leader A. Philip Randolph, Franklin Roosevelt issues an executive order barring discrimination in defense industries.

    1943 – Congress passes the Smith-Connally War Labor Disputes Act over President Franklin Roosevelt’s veto. It allows the federal government to seize and operate industries threatened by strikes that would interfere with war production. It was hurriedly created after the third coal strike in seven weeks.

    1985 – A total of 21 workers are killed when a fireworks factory near Hallett, Okla., explodes.

    1994 – Decatur, Ill., police pepper-gas workers at A.E. Staley plant gate one year into the company’s two-and-a-half-year lockout of Paperworkers Local 7837.
    Thought for today. "It was the labor movement that helped secure so much of what we take for granted today. The 40-hour work week, the minimum wage, family leave, health insurance, Social Security, Medicare, retirement plans. The cornerstones of the middle-class security all bear the union label." - Barack Obama

    https://wtop.com/back-in-the-day/202...n-history-273/

    https://labortribune.com/this-week-i...ry-june-21-27/

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  9. #1145
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Korean War

    The Korean war began on June 25, 1950, when some 75,000 soldiers from the North Korean People’s Army poured across the 38th parallel, the boundary between the Soviet-backed Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to the north and the pro-Western Republic of Korea to the south. This invasion was the first military action of the Cold War. By July, American troops had entered the war on South Korea’s behalf. As far as American officials were concerned, it was a war against the forces of international communism itself. After some early back-and-forth across the 38th parallel, the fighting stalled and casualties mounted with nothing to show for them. Meanwhile, American officials worked anxiously to fashion some sort of armistice with the North Koreans. The alternative, they feared, would be a wider war with Russia and China–or even, as some warned, World War III. Finally, in July 1953, the Korean War came to an end. In all, some 5 million soldiers and civilians lost their lives in what many in the U.S. refer to as “the Forgotten War” for the lack of attention it received compared to more well-known conflicts like World War I and II and the Vietnam War. The Korean peninsula is still divided today.

    READ MORE:

    https://www.history.com/topics/korea/korean-war

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  11. #1146
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Saturday, June 26, the 177th day of 2021. There are 188 days left in the year.

    In 1948, the Berlin Airlift began in earnest after the Soviet Union cut off land and water routes to the isolated western sector of Berlin.

    In 1993, President Bill Clinton announced the U.S. had launched missiles against Iraqi targets because of “compelling evidence” Iraq had plotted to assassinate former President George H.W. Bush.

    Five years ago: Fourteen people suffered stab wounds, cuts and bruises when fighting erupted outside the California state Capitol in Sacramento between more than 300 counter-protesters and about 30 members of the Traditionalist Worker Party, a white nationalist group.
    Today in labor history.

    1894 – Members of the American Railway Union, led by Eugene V. Debs, refuse to handle Pullman cars, in solidarity with Pullman strikers. Two dozen strikers were killed over the course of the strike.

    1959 – The 189-mile-long St. Lawrence Seaway opens, making the Great Lakes accessible to Atlantic shipping. Thousands of laborers toiled for decades to make it happen. Indirectly and directly, the Seaway today supports 75,000 jobs in Canada and 150,000 in the U.S.
    Thought for today. "Once you depart from the Ten Commandments as being the foundation of right and wrong, you are in a free fall." - Randall Terry

    https://wtop.com/back-in-the-day/202...n-history-271/

    https://labortribune.com/this-week-i...ry-june-21-27/

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  13. #1147
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Sunday, June 27, the 178th day of 2021. There are 187 days left in the year.

    In 1942, the FBI announced the arrests of eight Nazi saboteurs put ashore in Florida and Long Island, New York. (All were tried and sentenced to death; six were executed while two were spared for turning themselves in and cooperating with U.S. authorities.)

    In 1955, Illinois enacted the nation’s first automobile seat belt law. (The law did not require cars to have seat belts, but that they be made seat belt-ready.)

    In 1985, the legendary Route 66, which originally stretched from Chicago to Santa Monica, California, passed into history as officials decertified the road.
    Today in labor history.

    1935 – Congress passes the National Labor Relations Act, creating the structure for collective bargaining in the United States.

    1985 – A 26-day strike of New York City hotels by 26,000 workers — the first such walkout in 50 years — ends with a five-year contract calling for big wage and benefit gains.

    1993 – A.E. Staley locks out 763 workers in Decatur, Ill. The lockout was to last two and one-half years.

    2018 – The U.S. Supreme Court rules that state and local public-sector unions cannot require non-union members to pay anything to support the collective bargaining, grievance-handling and other costs of union work on their behalf. Voting with the 5-4 majority was Neil Gorsuch, who had just been named to the court by President Donald Trump.
    Thought for today. “The more a man knows, the more willing he is to learn. The less a man knows, the more positive he is that he knows everything...” ― Robert G. Ingersoll

    https://wtop.com/back-in-the-day/202...n-history-283/

    https://labortribune.com/this-week-i...ry-june-21-27/

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  15. #1148
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Monday, June 28, the 179th day of 2021. There are 186 days left in the year.

    In 1951, a TV version of the radio comedy program “Amos ‘N’ Andy” premiered on CBS. (It was the first network TV series to feature an all-Black cast, but came under criticism for racial stereotyping.)

    In 1978, the Supreme Court ordered the University of California-Davis Medical School to admit Allan Bakke (BAH’-kee), a white man who argued he’d been a victim of reverse racial discrimination.

    In 2019, avowed white supremacist James Alex Fields, who deliberately drove his car into a crowd of counterprotesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, killing a young woman and injuring dozens, apologized to his victims before being sentenced to life in prison on federal hate crime charges.
    Today in labor history.

    1850 – Birthday of machinist Matthew Maguire, who many believe first suggested Labor Day. Others believe it was Peter McGuire, a carpenter.

    1894 – President Grover Cleveland signs legislation declaring Labor Day an official U.S. holiday.

    1944 – A Liberty Ship named after the founding president of the American Federation of Labor, Samuel Gompers, is launched in Sausalito, Calif. She replaced a cargo steamship bearing Gompers’ name which had been torpedoed and sunk by a Japanese sub in the South Pacific the previous year.

    1988 – The federal government sues the Teamsters to force reforms on the union, the nation’s largest. The following March, the government and the union sign a consent decree requiring direct election of the union’s president and creation of an Independent Review Board.
    Thought for today. “Keep your best wishes, close to your heart and watch what happens” ― Tony DeLiso

    https://wtop.com/back-in-the-day/202...n-history-282/

    https://labortribune.com/this-week-i...ry-june-22-28/

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  17. #1149
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Tuesday, June 29, the 180th day of 2021. There are 185 days left in the year.

    In 1970, the United States ended a two-month military offensive into Cambodia.

    In 2009, disgraced financier Bernard Madoff received a 150-year sentence for his multibillion-dollar fraud. (Madoff died in prison in April 2021.)

    Ten years ago: In the first ruling by a federal appeals court on President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul, a panel in Cincinnati handed the administration a victory by agreeing that the government could require a minimum amount of insurance for Americans.
    Today in labor history.

    1885 – What is to be a seven-day streetcar strike begins in Chicago after several workers are unfairly fired. Wrote the police chief at the time, describing the strikers’ response to scabs: “One of my men said he was at the corner of Halsted and Madison streets, and although he could see fifty stones in the air, he couldn’t tell where they were coming from.” The strike was settled to the workers’ satisfaction.

    1934 – An executive order signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt establishes the National Labor Relations Board. A predecessor organization, the National Labor Board, established by the Depression-era National Industrial Recovery Act in 1933, had been struck down by the Supreme Court.

    1987 – The newly formed Jobs with Justice stages its first big support action, backing 3,000 picketing Eastern Airlines mechanics at Miami Airport.
    Thought for today. "What lies behind you and what lies in front of you, pales in comparison to what lies inside of you." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

    https://wtop.com/national/2021/06/today-in-history-281/

    https://labortribune.com/this-week-i...une-28-july-4/

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  19. #1150
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Wednesday, June 30, the 181st day of 2021. There are 184 days left in the year.

    On June 30, 1971, the Supreme Court ruled, 6-3, that the government could not prevent The New York Times or The Washington Post from publishing the Pentagon Papers.

    In 2013, 19 elite firefighters known as members of the Granite Mountain Hotshots were killed battling a wildfire northwest of Phoenix after a change in wind direction pushed the flames back toward their position.

    One year ago: Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves signed a landmark bill retiring the last state flag bearing the Confederate battle emblem.
    Today in labor history.

    1928 – Alabama outlaws the leasing of convicts to mine coal, a practice that had been in place since 1848. In 1898, 73 percent of the state’s total revenue came from this source. Twenty-five percent of all Black leased convicts died on the job.

    1998 – Up to 40,000 New York construction workers demonstrated in midtown Manhattan, protesting the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s awarding of a $33 million contract to a nonunion company. Eighteen police and three demonstrators were injured. “There were some scattered incidents and some minor violence,” Police Commissioner Howard Safir told the New York Post. “Generally, it was a pretty well-behaved crowd.”
    Thought for today. "Education is a better safeguard of liberty than a standing army." - Edward Everett

    https://wtop.com/back-in-the-day/202...n-history-280/

    https://labortribune.com/this-week-i...une-28-july-4/

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