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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Monday, May 4, the 125th day of 2020. There are 241 days left in the year.

    In 1932, mobster Al Capone, convicted of income-tax evasion, entered the federal penitentiary in Atlanta.

    In 1968, the Oroville Dam in Northern California was dedicated by Gov. Ronald Reagan; the 770-foot-tall earth-filled structure, a pet project of Reagan’s predecessor, Pat Brown, remains the tallest dam in the United States, but was also the scene of a near disaster in February 2017 when two spillways collapsed, threatening for a time to flood parts of three counties in the Sierra Nevada foothills.

    On May 4, 1970, Ohio National Guardsmen opened fire during an anti-war protest at Kent State University, killing four students and wounding nine others.

    Five years ago: Former technology executive Carly Fiorina and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson joined the rapidly expanding 2016 Republican presidential class, casting themselves as political outsiders in underdog campaigns, eager to challenge the elite of both parties.
    Today in labor history.

    A day after police killed four striking workers and injured hundreds, protesters gathered at Haymarket Square in Chicago. As the peaceful event drew to a close, a bomb was thrown into the police line, killing one officer and injuring several. Police responded by shooting into the crowd, killing one and wounding many. Eight anarchists were later framed even though most were not even present at the Haymarket rally and there was no evidence that linked any of them to the bombing. Four were hanged, one committed suicide and three were eventually pardoned by Illinois Gov. John Peter Altgeld. The Haymarket affair gave the pretext for a national witch hunt against anarchists and labor radicals and ended the quick rise of the Knights of Labor, a predecessor to the IWW. The Knights of Labor had been growing rapidly, attracting radicals and anarchist members. They professed solidarity with all workers, regardless of race or ethnicity. – 1886

    The “Freedom Ride” bus trips began throughout the American South. The Freedom Rides were organized by James Farmer and the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) to desegregate bus terminals. On May 14, the first freedom bus was attacked. – 1961
    Thought for Today: “Goodness, armed with power, is corrupted; and pure love without power is destroyed.” Reinhold Niebuhr, American theologian

    https://www.rep-am.com/news/today_in...story-may-4-2/

    https://voicesoflabor.com/2020/05/04...may-4th-3-2-2/

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  3. #672
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Tuesday, May 5, the 126th day of 2020. There are 240 days left in the year.

    In 1925, schoolteacher John T. Scopes was charged in Tennessee with violating a state law that prohibited teaching the theory of evolution. (Scopes was found guilty, but his conviction was later set aside.)

    In 1945, in the only fatal attack of its kind during World War II, a Japanese balloon bomb exploded on Gearhart Mountain in Oregon, killing the pregnant wife of a minister and five children.

    In 2009, Texas health officials confirmed the first death of a U.S. resident with swine flu.

    One year ago: White House national security adviser John Bolton said the Pentagon was deploying an aircraft carrier and other military resources to the Middle East; a defense official later said there had been “clear indications” that Iran and its proxy forces were preparing to possibly attack U.S. forces in the region.
    Today in labor history.

    The National Typographical Union was founded in Cincinnati, Ohio. It was renamed the International Typographical Union in 1869 in acknowledgment of Canadian members. When the ITU merged into CWA in 1986 it was the oldest existing union in the U.S. – 1852

    The Knights of Labor struck at Union Pacific against wage cuts and won. – 1884

    On Chicago’s West Side, police attacked Jewish workers as they tried to march into the Loop to protest slum conditions. – 1886

    Some 14,000 building trades workers and laborers, demanding an eight-hour workday, gathered at the Milwaukee Iron Company rolling mill in Bay View, Wisconsin. When they approached the mill they were fired on by 250 National Guardsmen under orders from the governor to shoot to kill. Seven died, including a 13-year-old boy. – 1886

    Nineteen machinists working for East Tennessee, Virginia, and Georgia Railroad gathered in a locomotive pit to decide what to do about a wage cut. They voted to form a union, which later became the Int’l Association of Machinists. – 1888

    Italian-American anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were arrested in Boston for murder and payroll robbery. Eventually, they were executed for a crime most believe they did not commit. – 1920

    High School teacher John T. Scopes was arrested for teaching the theory of evolution in a Tennessee school, in a violation of state law. – 1925

    The Infamous Battle of Harlan County (“Bloody Harlan”), Kentucky occurred. Also known as the Battle of Evarts, the strike began in response to wage cuts implemented in February. On May 5, a scab accosted a union worker, resulting in three deaths. Governor Flem Sampson called in the National Guard, which killed several more union miners. The Harlan County class war was the inspiration for Florence Reece‘s famous union song Which Side Are You On? The strike continued for years, with the miners finally winning in 1940. – 1931

    John J. Sweeney, president of the Service Employees International Union from 1980 to 1995, then president of the AFL-CIO from 1995 to 2009, was born in The Bronx, New York. – 1934

    A lumber strike began in the Pacific Northwest and would involve 40,000 workers by the time victory was achieved after 13 weeks: union recognition, a 50 cent per hour minimum wage and an eight-hour day. – 1937

    The U.S. unemployment rate dropped to a 30-year low of 3.9 percent; the rate for blacks and Hispanics was the lowest ever since the government started tracking such data. – 2000
    Thought for Today: “Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people.” Admiral Hyman G. Rickover, “father” of America’s nuclear navy

    https://www.rep-am.com/news/today_in...story-may-5-2/

    https://voicesoflabor.com/2020/05/05...may-5th-3-2-2/

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  5. #673
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Wednesday, May 6, the 127th day of 2020. There are 239 days left in the year.

    In 1882, President Chester Alan Arthur signed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which barred Chinese immigrants from the U.S. for 10 years (Arthur had opposed an earlier version with a 20-year ban).

    In 1994, former Arkansas state worker Paula Jones filed suit against President Bill Clinton, alleging he’d sexually harassed her in 1991.

    In 2004, President George W. Bush apologized for the abuse of Iraqi prisoners by American soldiers, calling it “a stain on our country’s honor”

    One year ago: Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer, reported to federal prison northwest of New York City to start a three-year sentence for crimes including tax evasion and campaign finance violations related to hush-money payments made to protect Trump.
    Today in labor history.

    The Works Projects Administration (WPA) was established at a cost of $4.8 billion (more than $72 billion in 2014 dollars) to provide work opportunities for millions during the Great Depression. – 1935

    400 black women working as tobacco stemmers walked off the job in a spontaneous revolt against poor working conditions and a $3 weekly wage at the Vaughan Company in Richmond, Virginia. – 1937

    John Steinbeck‘s The Grapes of Wrath won the Pulitzer Prize for the most distinguished novel of 1939. He ultimately won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962. – 1940
    Thought for Today: “To know your ruling passion, examine your castles in the air.” Richard Whately, English clergyman

    https://www.rep-am.com/news/today_in...story-may-6-2/

    https://voicesoflabor.com/2020/05/06...may-6th-3-2-2/

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  7. #674
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Thursday, May 7, the 128th day of 2020. There are 238 days left in the year.

    In 1945, Germany signed an unconditional surrender at Allied headquarters in Rheims (rams), France, ending its role in World War II.

    In 1963, the United States launched the Telstar 2 communications satellite.

    In 1998, the parent company of Mercedes-Benz agreed to buy Chrysler Corp. for more than $37 billion.

    Ten years ago: A BP-chartered vessel lowered a 100-ton concrete-and-steel vault onto the ruptured Deepwater Horizon well in an unprecedented, and ultimately unsuccessful, attempt to stop most of the gushing crude fouling the sea.
    Today in labor history.

    The Knights of St. Crispin union was formed at a secret meeting in Milwaukee. It grew to 50,000 members before being crushed by employers later that year. – 1867

    Bloody Tuesday occurred in San Francisco. The Street Carmen were among the most militant workers in San Francisco, a city that had one of the most organized and militant labor movements in the country in those days. The mayor, Eugene Schmitz, and two city supervisors were from the Union Labor Party. San Francisco workers, particularly the Carmen’s union, had struck in five of the six years from 1902 to 1907. Capitalists were starting to get sick of the power of the San Francisco unions and wanted to put a stop to them once and for all. Led by Rudolph Spreckels (the sugar magnate), they hired the Burns Detective agency and started by exposing Schmitz’ corruption as well as that of the Board of Supervisors. The corruption scandals dealt a serious blow to the unions’ political power, as their allies were up to their necks in legal troubles. The violence occurred when strikebreakers tried to run the streetcars, resulting in an exchange of gunfire between union carmen and scabs where two died and 20 were injured. Over the course of the strike, two dozen people died in accidents on the system while it was run by scab labor and an estimated 900+ others were injured. – 1907

    The Hotel Workers Industrial Union struck New York City’s finest hotels and restaurants, including the Waldorf and Astoria hotels and the Plaza. – 1912

    Philadelphia’s longest transit strike ended after 44 days. A key issue in the fight was the hiring and use of part-timers. – 1977
    Thought for Today: “There are those who believe something, and therefore will tolerate nothing; and on the other hand, those who tolerate everything, because they believe nothing.” Robert Browning, English poet

    https://www.rep-am.com/news/today_in...story-may-7-2/

    https://voicesoflabor.com/2020/05/07...may-7th-4-2-2/

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  9. #675
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Friday, May 8, the 129th day of 2020. There are 237 days left in the year.

    On May 8, 1945, President Harry S. Truman announced on radio that Nazi Germany’s forces had surrendered, and that “the flags of freedom fly all over Europe.”

    In 1973, militant American Indians who had held the South Dakota hamlet of Wounded Knee for 10 weeks surrendered.

    In 1987, Gary Hart, dogged by questions about his personal life, including his relationship with Miami model Donna Rice, withdrew from the race for the Democratic presidential nomination.

    In 1996, South Africa took another step from apartheid to democracy by adopting a constitution that guaranteed equal rights for blacks and whites.
    Today in labor history.

    The American Federation of Teachers was founded. – 1916

    Jerry Wurf, who served as president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) from 1964 to his death in 1981, was born in New York City. The union grew from about 220,000 members to more than 1 million during his presidency. – 1919

    A. Philip Randolph and Milton P. Webster founded the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. The Brotherhood was the very first African-American labor union to sign a collective bargaining agreement with a major U.S. corporation. – 1925

    About 200 construction workers in New York City attacked a crowd of Vietnam war protesters four days after the Kent State killings. More than 70 people were injured, including four police officers. Peter Brennan, head of the New York building trades, was honored at the Nixon White House two weeks later and was eventually named Secretary of Labor. – 1970

    Some 12,000 Steelworker-represented workers at Goodyear Tire & Rubber won an 18-day strike for improved wages and job security. – 1997
    Thought for Today: “What you see is news, what you know is background, what you feel is opinion.” Lester Markel, American editor

    https://www.rep-am.com/news/today_in...story-may-8-2/

    https://voicesoflabor.com/2020/05/08...may-8th-2-2-2/

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  11. #676
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Saturday, May 9, the 130th day of 2020. There are 236 days left in the year.

    In 1914, President Woodrow Wilson, acting on a joint congressional resolution, signed a proclamation designating the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day.

    In 1961, in a speech to the National Association of Broadcasters, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Newton N. Minow decried the majority of television programming as a “vast wasteland.”

    In 1974, the House Judiciary Committee opened public hearings on whether to recommend the impeachment of President Richard Nixon. (The committee ended up adopting three articles of impeachment against the president, who resigned before the full House took up any of them.)

    One year ago: Trump honored the World Series Champion Boston Red Sox at the White House; all of the team’s white players attended, but nearly a dozen team members, all players of color, skipped the visit, as did manager Alex Cora, who had expressed frustration with the administration’s response to a devastating hurricane in his native Puerto Rico.
    Today in labor history.

    A coal mine exploded at Roslyn, Washington killing 45 mine workers. – 1892

    Striking tram workers blew up a tramcar during riots in St. Louis. – 1900

    Japanese workers struck at Oahu, Hawaii’s Aiea Plantation, demanding the same pay as Portuguese and Puerto Rican workers. Ultimately 7,000 workers and their families remained out until August when the strike was broken. – 1909

    Legendary Western Federation of Miners leader William “Big Bill” Haywood went on trial for murder in the bombing death of former Idaho governor Frank Steunenberg, who had brutally suppressed the state’s miners. Haywood ultimately was declared innocent. – 1907

    Longshoremen began a strike for a union hiring hall and union recognition, ultimately leading to the San Francisco general strike. After World War One, West Coast longshore workers were poorly organized or represented by “company unions.” The IWW had tried to organize them and had some successes ( for example, San Pedro in 1922), but they were ultimately crushed by injunctions, imprisonment, deportation and vigilante violence. While longshoremen lacked a well-organized union, they retained a syndicalist sentiment and militancy. Many Wobblies were still working the docks. On May 9, 1934, longshoremen walked off the job at ports up and down the West Coast, soon to be followed by sailors. Strikers were shot by the bosses’ goons in San Pedro. There was also violence in Oakland and San Francisco. Street battles between the cops and strikers continued in San Francisco, heating up on July 3, and culminating in Bloody Thursday, on July 5, when 3 workers were shot by police (two of them died). The attack led to a four-day general strike that effectively shut down commerce in San Francisco, despite police violence and attempts to weaken it by national unions. – 1934

    Hollywood studio mogul Louis B. Mayer recognized the Screen Actors Guild. SAG leaders reportedly were bluffing when they told Mayer that 99 percent of all actors would walk out the next morning unless he dealt with the union. Some 5,000 actors attended a victory gathering the following day at Hollywood Legion Stadium; a day later, SAG membership increased 400 percent. – 1937

    Labor leader Walter Reuther and his wife May died suspiciously in an airplane crash. Repeated attempts had been made on Reuther’s life going back to 1938. – 1971

    4,000 garment workers at Farah Manufacturing Company in El Paso went out on strike over union representation. In January 1974, after a successful national boycott, the NLRB ruled in the workers’ favor, and the company finally recognized the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. The 1974 contract included pay increases, job security and seniority rights, and a grievance procedure. – 1972
    Thought for Today: “Life is a series of collisions with the future; it is not the sum of what we have been, but what we yearn to be.” Jose Ortega y Gasset, Spanish philosopher

    https://www.rep-am.com/news/today_in...story-may-9-2/

    https://voicesoflabor.com/2020/05/09...may-9th-3-2-2/

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  13. #677
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Happy Mother's Day ! To those we have lost and to those who still nurture in us the love and compassion only a Mother can instill in her family.

    Today is Sunday, May 10, the 131st day of 2020. There are 235 days left in the year.

    On May 10, 1924, J. Edgar Hoover was named acting director of the Bureau of Investigation (later known as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, or FBI)

    In 1933, the Nazis staged massive public book burnings in Germany.

    In 2005, a federal bankruptcy judge approved United Airlines’ plan to terminate its employees’ pension plans.

    Five years ago: Cuban President Raul Castro met with Pope Francis at the Vatican to thank him for working for U.S.-Cuba detente and said he was so impressed by the pontiff, he was considering returning to the Catholic church.
    Today in labor history.

    Thanks to an army of thousands of Chinese and Irish immigrants who laid 2,000 miles of track, the nation’s first transcontinental railway line was finished by the joining of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific lines at Promontory Point, Utah. – 1869

    Pullman fired 3 workers for being on the grievance committee, leading to a strike that shut down the company a day later. – 1894

    U.S. and Canadian workers formed the Western Labor Union. It favored industrial organization and independent labor party politics. – 1898

    200 labor leaders were arrested in Chicago for complicity in the murder of two policemen and the bombing of factories – 1922

    UMW struck at selected U.S. mines. – 1993

    A federal bankruptcy judge permitted United Airlines to legally abandon responsibility for pensions covering 120,000 employees. – 2005
    Thought for Today: “Nothing recedes like success.” Walter Winchell, American columnist and broadcaster

    https://www.rep-am.com/news/today_in...tory-may-10-2/

    https://voicesoflabor.com/2020/05/10...ay-10th-3-2-2/

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  15. #678
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Monday, May 11, the 132nd day of 2020. There are 234 days left in the year.

    In 1935, the Rural Electrification Administration was created as one of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal programs.

    In 1950, President Harry S. Truman formally dedicated the Grand Coulee Dam in Washington state.

    In 1973, the espionage trial of Daniel Ellsberg and Anthony Russo in the “Pentagon Papers” case came to an end as Judge William M. Byrne dismissed all charges, citing government misconduct.

    In 2006, lawmakers demanded answers after a USA Today report that the National Security Agency was secretly collecting records of millions of ordinary Americans’ phone calls; President George W. Bush sought to assure Americans their civil liberties were being “fiercely protected.”
    Today in labor history.

    The Pullman Railroad Strike began in Chicago, Illinois. This was the largest industrial strike to date in the United States. Eugene Debs rose to prominence as a labor leader during this strike, which was eventually broken by federal troops. The strike and boycott crippled railway traffic nationwide and at its peak involved 250,000+ workers in 27 states. At least 24 strikers were killed. – 1894

    Marxist theorist, socialist labor party and union organizer Daniel De Leon died on this date in New York City. De Leon was also a founding member of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) in 1904. – 1914

    Seventeen crewmen on the iron ore freighter Henry Steinbrenner died when the ship, carrying nearly 7,000 tons of ore, sank during a violent storm on Lake Erie. Another 16 crewmen survived. – 1953

    Poor People’s Campaign caravans arrived in Washington, D.C. with Ralph Abernathy and the Southern Christian Leadership Corps. They were granted a permit for an encampment on the Mall. – 1968
    Thought for Today: “Life is 10 percent what you make it, and 90 percent how you take it.” Irving Berlin, American songwriter

    https://www.rep-am.com/news/today_in...tory-may-11-2/

    https://voicesoflabor.com/2020/05/11...ay-11th-3-2-2/

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  17. #679
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Tuesday, May 12, the 133rd day of 2020. There are 233 days left in the year.

    In 1922, a 20-ton meteor crashed near Blackstone, Virginia.

    In 1958, the United States and Canada signed an agreement to create the North American Air Defense Command (later the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD).

    Five years ago: An Amtrak train traveling from Washington, D.C. to New York derailed and crashed in Philadelphia, killing eight people.

    One year ago: The White House’s top economic adviser acknowledged on “Fox News Sunday” that U.S. consumers and businesses pay the tariffs that the administration had imposed on billions of dollars of Chinese goods.
    Today in labor history.

    Nearly 150,000 anthracite coal miners went on strike in Eastern Pennsylvania for higher wages, better working conditions, and recognition of their union: the United Mine Workers of America. After months of an extreme coal shortage, President Teddy Roosevelt intervened, a commission was set up, and the strike was called off after 163 days. – 1902

    The “Three Day’s Battle” began along both shores of the Tug River in West Virginia, with sniping by labor strikers at state police, deputies and coal company officials. – 1921

    The Massachusetts Supreme Court upheld the death sentences of Sacco and Vanzetti, denying their motion for a new trial. – 1926

    The Laundry and Dry Cleaning International Union was granted a charter by the AFL-CIO. – 1958

    The International Organization of Masters, Mates & Pilots merged with the Longshoremen’s’ Association. – 1971

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents raided the Agriprocessors, Inc. slaughterhouse and meatpacking plant in Postville, Iowa, arresting nearly 400 immigrant workers. Some 300 were convicted on document fraud charges. The raid was the largest ever to date. Several employees and lower and mid-level managers were convicted on various charges, but not the owner—although he later was jailed for bank fraud and related crimes. – 2008
    Thought for Today: “Mistrust the man who finds everything good; the man who finds everything evil; and still more the man who is indifferent to everything.” Johann Kaspar Lavater, Swiss theologian

    https://www.rep-am.com/news/today_in...tory-may-12-2/

    https://voicesoflabor.com/2020/05/12...ay-12th-3-2-2/

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  19. #680
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    Default Re: This Date in History

    Today is Wednesday, May 13, the 134th day of 2020. There are 232 days left in the year.

    In 1917, three shepherd children reported seeing a vision of the Virgin Mary near Fatima, Portugal; it was the first of six such apparitions that the children claimed to have witnessed.

    In 1981, Pope John Paul II was shot and seriously wounded in St. Peter’s Square by Turkish assailant Mehmet Ali Agca

    Five years ago: The House voted 338-88 to end the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of Americans’ phone records and replace it with a system to search the data held by telephone companies on a case-by-case basis.

    One year ago: Sending Wall Street into a slide, China announced higher tariffs on $60 billion in U.S. goods in retaliation for President Donald Trump’s latest penalties on Chinese products; the Dow industrials finished more than 600 points lower.
    Today in labor history.

    The Canadian government established the Department of Labour. It took the U.S. another four years. – 1909

    4,000 dockworkers and members of the predominantly African-American Marine Transport Workers’ Local 8 of the Industrial Workers of the World began what would be a successful strike in Philadelphia over wages and union recognition. Through strikes, slow-downs, and other workplace actions, Local 8 secured raises for all dockworkers, including those who were not IWW members, well into the 1940s. – 1913

    UAW President Douglas A. Fraser was named to the Chrysler Corporation board of directors, becoming the first union representative ever to sit on the board of a major U.S. corporation. – 1980

    Organized by the New York Taxi Workers Alliance, drivers in New York City went on a one-day strike to protest Mayor Rudolph Giuliani’s proposed taxicab regulations. “City officials were stunned by the success of a strike by taxi drivers,” the New York Times reported, “when all but a few hundred of the city’s 12,187 cabs remained parked.” – 1998
    Thought for Today: “To want to be the cleverest of all is the biggest folly.” Sholem Aleichem

    https://www.rep-am.com/news/today_in...tory-may-13-2/

    https://voicesoflabor.com/2020/05/13...ay-13th-3-2-2/

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