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  1. #11
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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    SOME YOUNGER AMAZON WORKERS IN BESSEMER, NEW TO UNIONS, ARE STILL UNDECIDED
    Older workers, who had experience with labor organizing at now-closed plants in the area, are leading the Amazon union push.



    JASON RECEIVES UPWARDS of two dozen text messages a day about his warehouse’s union drive. Some are pro-union, and some against it. There are those from Amazon, his employer, to “protect what you have.” Then there are messages from the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, known as RWDSU, urging him to use his vote to pave a new future for himself and the 5,805 workers at Amazon’s colossal warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama.

    When he goes into work, Jason is confronted with “Vote No” signs blanketing the 855,000-square-foot building, known as BHM1. The signs are in break rooms, at workstations, and even in bathroom stalls.

    Still, just days before voting ends on March 29, Jason remains undecided.

    “Everyone’s been confused,” said Jason, who like many of the 10 Bessemer warehouse workers interviewed for this story did not provide his surname for fear of repercussions. “In my opinion, no one around my age in the building has a clear-cut answer of how they’re going to decide.”

    The 20-year-old stower — responsible for lifting boxes and scanning them for processing over a grueling 10-hour shift — is part of a sizable group of younger, noncommittal BHM1 workers. Their votes or abstentions could determine the outcome of the most closely watched American union election in decades.

    In a sign of the push to engage young workers in the union drive, groundwork is being laid to bring Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., to Alabama this weekend, according to two sources with knowledge of the planning. The trip, being put together by Sanders’s office and a constellation of activist groups, along with the union organizing Amazon workers, would bring one of Congress’s most ardent supporters of the labor push to the front line.

    Read more
    https://theintercept.com/2021/03/23/...ernie-sanders/

  2. #12
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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..


  3. #13
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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    I do hope the union is successful..
    Amazon union drive voting ends, counting set to begin
    AFP 1 hr ago


    Voting concluded Monday on whether to create the first Amazon labor union in the United States, at a warehouse in Alabama, after a historic, five-month David vs Goliath campaign
    Attention has now turned to ballot counting by federal officials following a contentious unionization drive which has drawn national attention and the involvement of numerous political figures and activists.

    The campaign continued to the bitter end with labor activists from around the United States meeting workers before dawn to congratulate them for their efforts.

    "I'm proud of the workers at Amazon for standing up and saying enough," said Joshua Brewer, the local president of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union.

    The RWDSU will represent the Bessemer warehouse's 5,800 employees if they choose to unionize in the vote that ended Monday.

    The National Labor Relations Board, the federal agency which manages union elections, was set to begin the count on Tuesday. The final results could take several days or weeks, given that some ballots may be challenged based on errors in signature or other factors.

    The bruising months-long unionizing battle has sparked intense debate over workplace conditions at the online retail behemoth, which has more than 800,000 US employees.

    "Amazon's biggest fear already happened: 3,000 of their own employees said we cannot work in these conditions... It exposed a systemic problem in Amazon's warehouses," Brewer told AFP.

    Coming at a time when Joe Biden has promised to be the country's "most pro-union president," the Bessemer warehouse effort could open the floodgates to unionization drives at other Amazon sites, as well as at other firms, activists say.
    Unions and political leaders have argued that Amazon employees face constant pressure and monitoring, with little job protection, highlighting the need for collective bargaining.

    Amazon has argued that most of its workers don't want or need a union and that it already provides more than most other employers, with a minimum $15 hourly wage and other benefits.

    For five months, union organizers in Bessemer have been posted at the intersection between a busy interstate highway and several hulking industrial buildings to make their case.

    "We need safe working conditions. We need to be treated with respect and equality," said Amazon employee Jennifer Bates. "We're not getting paid what we deserve to get paid."

    Another employee, Lafonda Townsend, said she was initially happy with her pay.

    "But then that was before I got in there," she said, describing having to eat fast on breaks "like a prisoner... because if you're one minute late, there's an hour unpaid time that they're taking away from you."

    Amazon went on a hiring spree in 2020 and nearly doubled its net profit to $21 billion, thanks to the explosion in demand during the pandemic.

    But the second-largest US employer is embroiled in a fierce battle with political leaders and the public over its policies.

    - 'Maintain power' -

    Its spokespeople recently attacked left-wing politician Bernie Sanders, who supports the union, on Twitter.

    They also insisted that no worker had been reduced to urinating in plastic bottles because of a lack of time to go to the bathroom, contrary to media reports.

    On site, the company uses all sorts of tactics to dissuade would-be unionists, from text messages touting existing benefits to posters in the toilets.

    Many observers say the issue is less about finances, and more about control.

    "Amazon is like most US employers. It wants to maintain power over everything and make sure that workers do not have the ability to negotiate over any aspect of their jobs," said Rebecca Givan, a professor of labor relations at Rutgers University.

    "Big tech companies, like other employers, will spend an almost unlimited amount of money in persuading workers not to unionize," she said.

    Dawn Hoag, a warehouse quality manager, believes employees don't need representatives to voice their needs.
    "If... all these stories were all true, then there are 5,800 idiots working inside the building where I work, and I don't work with a single idiot, and I'm not an idiot," she told AFP.

    But Darryl Richardson, the 51-year-old employee who first called in the RWSDU, said it was time to "take a stand."

    "I need job security. I need to be able to retire one day," he said.

    Richardson's call has already opened the floodgates, Brewer added.

    "We have received over 1,000 different inquiries from about 50 different warehouses so far," he said.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world...in/ar-BB1f5A7M

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  5. #14
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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    Why It’s Taking So Darn Long to Figure Out Who Won Amazon’s Union Vote

    Voting in the closely watched union election at Amazon’s facility in Bessemer, Alabama, ended on Monday, and the National Labor Relations Board began counting the ballots on Tuesday. The facility’s nearly 6,000 employees have been voting since February on whether to join the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union and become Amazon’s first unionized workplace. Yet it could take days or even weeks until we know the results. That’s because the NLRB’s counting process is slow and exacting. If you thought that presidential vote-counting can get complicated, this is something else.

    As the New York Times reported, the process begins with a conference in which an NLRB official reads the names of every employee who submitted a ballot. Representatives from Amazon and the RWDSU check those names against their own employee rolls, and either side can contest a person’s eligibility—for instance, Reuters found that 19 people received ballots even though they’d already left the company, and at least two of them voted. Any contested ballots get set aside. Reuters further reports that just determining the eligibility of the voters likely won’t be completed until later this week.
    After the contested ballots are removed from the pile, the NLRB starts counting the votes. The board counts and then recounts votes in 100-ballot batches. The amount of time this will take depends partly on how many people voted—if that number is in the thousands, it could take weeks. It only requires a simple majority for the union to be approved. If it turns out, though, that the number of contested ballots is larger than the margin of victory, then the NLRB will have to hold a hearing in which Amazon and the RWDSU argue over whether certain votes should or shouldn’t be counted. Once that portion of the process is finished, which could also take multiple days, only then will we finally have a result.

    But the result at that point isn’t necessarily final. Either side can still file challenges to the NLRB about how the voting was facilitated, which could lead to throwing out the results and holding a new election. The union, for instance, could argue that Amazon improperly pressured employees to vote no. Amazon, on the other hand, could quibble with the fact that voting happened via mail, rather than in person.
    The counting process is the homestretch for a union drive that’s involved months of high-profile lobbying from employees and fierce pushback from Amazon. The intensity of the dueling PR campaigns seemed to reach a boiling point over the last week as voting came to a close. This was in part because, according to Recode, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos pressed company officials to respond more aggressively to criticisms of the company. It appears that this directive led to some perplexing behavior from Amazon-affiliated accounts on Twitter last week. Dave Clark, CEO of worldwide consumer at Amazon, notably decided to suggest that Sen. Bernie Sanders was less progressive than the company. On Friday, the @amazonnews account also tried to pick fights with Sanders, taunting him over Vermont’s $11.75 minimum wage, and with Sen. Elizabeth Warren, suggesting that she was trying to silence the company by pursuing antitrust legislation. The account’s combativeness was reportedly so unusual that it led security staff to flag the activity as suspicious and warn that @amazonnews might have been hacked.

    https://slate.com/technology/2021/03...-how-long.html

  6. #15
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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    NLRB finds Amazon fired two employees over union activism.

    Amazon illegally fired 2 activist employees, labor board reportedly finds
    Amazon acted illegally by firing two employees who publicly criticized the organization last year, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) found, the New York Times reported on Monday.
    Emily Cunningham and Maren Costa were fired in April 2020 after speaking out on their concerns about the company's impact on climate change, and its treatment of warehouse workers during the pandemic. At the time, Amazon said the pair had violated internal policies.
    The NLRB — an independent federal agency that protects the rights of private-sector employees in the US — said it would accuse Amazon of unfair labor practices if it did not settle the case with the women, Cunningham told the New York Times.
    https://www.businessinsider.com/nyt-...ployees-2021-4

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  8. #16
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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    Amazon Union Election Tally Starts, Turnout 55 Percent

    U.S. regulators on Thursday started tallying votes in Amazon.com Inc's closely watched union election in Alabama, whose outcome will have far-reaching implications for U.S. organized labor.

    For transparency, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) held a Zoom video call and set up multiple cameras that participants could watch.

    The election had voter turnout of about 55%, the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) said in a statement on Wednesday.

    More than 3,200 mail ballots were received by the labor board in an election open to over 5,800 workers at Amazon's warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama, the union said. The workers are voting on whether to join the RWDSU and have their warehouse be the first Amazon facility ever to unionize in the United States.


    By comparison, 432 other mail-ballot elections from mid-March 2020 through September 2020 saw turnout of 72%, according to data disclosed by the NLRB in a decision last year. In the nearly six months prior to that — pre-dating the COVID-19 outbreak in the United States — mail-ballot turnout was 55%, the NLRB decision document said.

    https://www.newsmax.com/newsfront/tu...08/id/1016886/

  9. #17
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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    Oh no!! Another Amazon facilities employees walked off the job.. And here I thought it was such a great job..

    Amazon Employees Stage Walkout at Distribution Center Over Working Conditions

    A group of Amazon employees walked out of the mega-retailer’s Gage Park distribution center Wednesday morning, calling on the company to stop understaffing the facility and to provide accommodations for people working a 10.5-hour overnight “megacycle” shift.

    “We’re tired of being used,” said Rakyle Johnson of Amazonians United Chicagoland on a livestream. “We work so hard, we give so much to our company … but they don’t give anything back.”

    An organizer told WTTW News that 20-30 workers walked out, leaving management frustrated and angry. The organizer said 5-10 people who weren’t scheduled to work Wednesday joined in support. They were also joined by Ald. Byron Sigcho-Lopez (25th Ward) who said workers were being “exploited.”

    A group from Amazonians United Chicagoland demonstrated last week outside the same Gage Park facility, known as DIL3, to demand accommodations for a shift from 1:20 a.m. to 11:50 a.m. that they say the company pushed them into. They’re seeking a $2 per hour raise; accommodations for employees who can only work part of the shift because they need to care for children or for medical reasons; ride-share trips to and from work, which they say the company provides in New York City; and full 20-minute breaks without managers cutting them short.

    Employees say management has not responded to their demands.

    “We’re still waiting for you to tell us, ‘OK, we’re working on it,’” Johnson said. “We’re not going to be silent. We’re going to have our voices heard loud and clear.”
    Read more
    https://news.wttw.com/2021/04/07/ama...eACiy4t4UmNRf0

  10. #18
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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    Appeal likely to follow Amazon unionization vote in Alabama

    The first major unionization drive at an Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) warehouse in the U. S. looks set to fail as results continue to be tallied at a fulfillment center located in Bessemer, Alabama. With about half the 3,215 ballots counted so far by the National Labor Relations Board, about 70% of Amazon employees at BHM1 have sided against unionization, which is well ahead of estimates that forecast somewhat of a close race. Officials will resume counting today, when a final outcome could become clear.

    Bigger picture: Over the past few weeks, Amazon has pulled out all the stops to try and convince the workers at BHM1 that unionization would not be in their favor. It seems like the efforts paid off, which included aggressive advertising, mandatory anti-union meetings and sending workers multiple texts per day. Not only did Amazon attract new workers to vote against the effort, but it also appears to have changed the mindset of workers who were planning to back the union, based on the early signs of support needed to trigger the vote in the first place.

    Once the results have been formally certified by the National Labor Relations Board, there will likely be an appeal from The Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union. The RWDSU is already saying that some of Amazon's tactics against the union were illegal. For example, a dropbox that was placed in the parking lot of the facility could have intimidated workers into thinking that Amazon was monitoring the vote and was a direct effort to influence the ballot. Others have pointed to Amazon's push to have the county change the timing of a traffic light leaving the warehouse parking lot, which the company says was meant to alleviate congestion, though union organizers say it deprived them of a venue for canvassing workers.

    What's next? Some labor experts think the union has a pretty strong case, with local regulators having the power to overturn the vote entirely and grant the union a victory. If that would happen, the case could go to Washington, where Amazon could appeal on a national level to the NLRB. Don't expect an easy outcome. The entire process could take another few months.

    Earlier this week, the NYT reported that Amazon could face a national labor probe after the NLRB found it illegally fired two UX designers for publicly pushing for the company to address warehouse worker concerns.

    https://seekingalpha.com/news/368058...ote-in-alabama

  11. #19
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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    Quote Originally Posted by Docker View Post
    Appeal likely to follow Amazon unionization vote in Alabama

    The first major unionization drive at an Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) warehouse in the U. S. looks set to fail as results continue to be tallied at a fulfillment center located in Bessemer, Alabama. With about half the 3,215 ballots counted so far by the National Labor Relations Board, about 70% of Amazon employees at BHM1 have sided against unionization, which is well ahead of estimates that forecast somewhat of a close race. Officials will resume counting today, when a final outcome could become clear.

    Bigger picture: Over the past few weeks, Amazon has pulled out all the stops to try and convince the workers at BHM1 that unionization would not be in their favor. It seems like the efforts paid off, which included aggressive advertising, mandatory anti-union meetings and sending workers multiple texts per day. Not only did Amazon attract new workers to vote against the effort, but it also appears to have changed the mindset of workers who were planning to back the union, based on the early signs of support needed to trigger the vote in the first place.

    Once the results have been formally certified by the National Labor Relations Board, there will likely be an appeal from The Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union. The RWDSU is already saying that some of Amazon's tactics against the union were illegal. For example, a dropbox that was placed in the parking lot of the facility could have intimidated workers into thinking that Amazon was monitoring the vote and was a direct effort to influence the ballot. Others have pointed to Amazon's push to have the county change the timing of a traffic light leaving the warehouse parking lot, which the company says was meant to alleviate congestion, though union organizers say it deprived them of a venue for canvassing workers.

    What's next? Some labor experts think the union has a pretty strong case, with local regulators having the power to overturn the vote entirely and grant the union a victory. If that would happen, the case could go to Washington, where Amazon could appeal on a national level to the NLRB. Don't expect an easy outcome. The entire process could take another few months.

    Earlier this week, the NYT reported that Amazon could face a national labor probe after the NLRB found it illegally fired two UX designers for publicly pushing for the company to address warehouse worker concerns.

    https://seekingalpha.com/news/368058...ote-in-alabama

    The sad part is that only 3215 workers voted..

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  13. #20
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    Default Re: AMAZON and the UNION..

    The Amazon union vote failed. 2 workers explain why they voted against unionizing.

    Voting closed on March 29. On Friday, the National Labor Relations Board's tally showed Amazon crossing the threshold to defeat the union attempt. Out of over 5,800 warehouse workers at this location, 3,215 cast ballots. The final tally was 1,798 votes against unionizing and 738 votes for the union, with 70.9% of valid votes counted against unionizing. The union had needed 50% plus one of the ballots to win.

    The Bessemer warehouse saw a visit from Sen. Bernie Sanders, national media attention, and divisions over whether to unionize. Jennings and other employees who voted against the union said Amazon already provided everything a union would. Amazon also made this argument.Since the workers voted against forming a union, there will not be any bargaining. But the RWDSU's director of communications, Chelsea Connor, had said in March that pro-union workers were vocal about the "time off task" system, which marks the time they are away from their stations, and about wanting to improve working conditions. Workers who were pushing for the union had also said they wanted better job security.

    Jennings told Insider in March that she'd joined the ranks of the "no" voters almost immediately after receiving her ballot. She said she feared losing free time off and benefits over the course of bargaining.Thomas Eady, a former coal miner who has worked in unionized industries before, also voted no.He said in messages to Insider in March that he used to be "a huge pro-union person" but that his time working for unions had made him believe that his work ethic didn't matter and that unions would value seniority over everything.

    Eady said he didn't believe unions could adequately protect against termination. "They can only act like a middleman," he said. In the past, Eady worked for a foundry union and a coal-mine union. He said he saw unions as "just collecting money and overpaying themselves." At Amazon, he works as a stower, the same role as Jennings. "I haven't really seen that many people who support the union" at the fulfillment center, Eady said. Eady also cited Amazon's "decent pay and benefits'' as another reason he voted against the union.Jennings agreed. "I think we make really good money for what we do," she said.

    Amazon had touted its $15.30 minimum wage and benefits package as a reason workers did not need to unionize.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/amaz...alabama-2021-3

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