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  1. #1
    Old School... and proud!!

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    Default 2021 IBT Election

    Teamster Election Dates

    The ballots to elect the new International Teamster President and all International officers will be mailed to all members on October 4. They should be received by members in mid-October, and will be due back by November 15, 2021.

    The count will be conducted by the Election Supervisor, with many observers present, during the week of November 15.

    https://www.tdu.org/teamster_election_dates



    https://www.ibtvote.org/files/List%2...206.20.21a.pdf

  2. #2
    Old School... and proud!!

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    Default Re: 2021 IBT Election

    Here’s some information that I would like to share about Brent Taylor… who will be running on the TDU’’s O'Brien-Zuckerman ticket…

    First… He was the BA at ABF Freight in Dallas with Local 745. He… along with Turncoat Tyson Johnson was pushing for the 15% begback in 2010.

    Second… He also pushed for that POS 2013 ABF contract along with the president of Local 745 Ken Bryant who was also on that so called “Dream Team” negotiating committee…

    And all he did was talk shit about TDU being the scum of the earth… low down… lying bastards the whole time from the onset of the 2010 begback’s discussions… which he denied were ever taking place for months after they started… to after the 2013 vote count. And now… Junior’s and Turncoat Tyson’s lackey has jumped ship and joined his mortal enemy. That sure doesn’t sound like a man that would act in the Rank and File’s best interest to me… his own… but definitely not yours.

    But just don’t take my word for it… look what TDU thought about Brent even as late as 2017…

    Hoffa has appointed Kris Taylor from Dallas Local 745 to negotiate the UPS Freight contract. UPS Freight Teamsters need to be ready to fight for a good contract, because their lead negotiator will not be. Hoffa passed over Central Region Vice President Tony Jones to opt for a Business Agent from Dallas Local 745. Jones is an outspoken opponent of concessions.

    Taylor, the brother of Local 745 principal officer Brent Taylor, is a reliable Hoffa hack who has never seen a contract giveback he doesn’t like.
    The Taylor brothers have endorsed concessions in every Teamster national contract in the trucking industry, including UPS Freight, UPS, ABF, YRC, and carhaul.


    https://www.tdu.org/hoffa_names_ups_freight_negotiator
    And look at the way TDU is promoting the O'Brien-Zuckerman ticket…

    The O’Brien-Zuckerman Teamsters United Slate is officially on the ballot, and the campaign for a new leadership and a new direction in the Teamsters is on. They didn’t spring from the Hoffa administration, but from the reform movement and the challenging O’Brien Zuckerman Teamsters United slate. Change is coming from the bottom up, not the top down. The key to victory this November is to organize in every local to turn out votes for a new direction.

    https://www.tdu.org/we_re_on_the_bal..._s_time_to_win
    I’m just putting this out there because I think everyone has the right to know about the likes of Brent Taylor and what Brent and the TDU thought of each other in the past and what they think of each other now… because IMO… he’s definitely not a friend of the Rank and File… only the leadership at the time’s lackey who I wouldn’t trust one damn bit.

    By the way... Brents definition of the TDU at all those union meeting of the past... Too Dumb to Understand. Well... it looks like he understands them now.

  3. #3
    Old School... and proud!!

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    Default Re: 2021 IBT Election

    Teamsters election may hold cards for upcoming UPS contract talks

    An O’Brien victory in November could mean much aggravation for the company when talks begin later next year.

    The five-year contract between the Teamsters and UPS Inc., the Teamsters’ largest employer with 268,000 members, doesn’t expire until July 31, 2023. Talks aren’t likely to start until late 2022. In reality, however, the contract cycle starts around Thanksgiving 2021. Barring unforeseen circumstances, the Teamsters will by then have elected a new slate of officers, including a general president and general secretary-treasurer, to run the 1.4 million- member union for the next five years. At stake is the election of a new president to succeed James P. Hoffa, who at 80 is stepping down after 23 years at the helm. Ballots are expected to be counted during the first half of November, with a winner expected to be announced soon after. There had been three presidential candidates. Steve Vairma, secretary-treasurer of Local 455 in Denver, Kevin P. Moore, president of Local 299 in Detroit, and Sean M. O’Brien, president of Local 25 in Boston. Vairma is favored by Hoffa and other top executives at the international level because he is perceived to represent continuity and stability in a post-Hoffa world. Moore, a close Hoffa ally, did not get Hoffa’s first nod as his successor and dropped out of the race in June.

    Then there’s O’Brien, who Atlanta-based UPS (NYSE:UPS) hopes and prays doesn’t win. At 46 the youngest of the two candidates, O’Brien has a reputation as a firebrand. Some of that flame has, over the years, been directed at UPS. “He is feared inside UPS for being a no-compromise hardliner,” said one industry executive familiar with the situation. “In any situation involving his local, [UPS] felt it had no good way to control him.” In September 2017, Hoffa abruptly fired O’Brien as head of the Teamsters’ small-package division around the time the union was gearing up for contract talks with UPS. The union said it acted in the best interests of the members at UPS. However, Hoffa critics said that O’Brien was forced out because he took an ultra-aggressive negotiating posture toward UPS. This ran counter to Hoffa’s more collegial approach that some endorsed as rational but others saw as being too conciliatory at the expense of member interests.

    Hoffa was further angered by O’Brien’s public demand that Fred Zuckerman, head of Local 89 in Louisville, Kentucky, home of UPS’ Worldport global air hub, serve on the UPS national contract negotiating committee. Zuckerman, who nearly beat Hoffa in the 2016 general election in part because he got the majority of votes from UPS Teamsters, happens to be O’Brien’s running mate this year. Both are cut from the same militant cloth, which, should their slate prevail, is likely to give UPS negotiators heartburn as bargaining time draws near.

    O’Brien was instrumental in the union earlier this year amending its constitution to eliminate what is known as the “two-thirds rule,”’ which effectively ratified a contract even if it had been rejected by the majority who voted. The 2023 UPS contract will be decided under a “majority-rule” formula, a far cry from 2018 when Teamsters leadership imposed the contract even though it was rejected by 54% of the Teamsters who voted. The move angered many in the union who saw it as overriding the will of the members and unwarranted interference in their affairs. It also gave O’Brien fodder to push his core campaign message of returning the union to its members. A hard-nosed attitude combined with members’ desire for greater involvement and less accommodation with management gives the O’Brien slate the edge, said Patricia Campos-Medina, director of the Worker Institute at Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations. “The strength of the union was that it always respected the membership’s voice,” Campos-Medina said. The explosive growth of e-commerce during the pandemic has put severe strains on delivery and warehouse workers at UPS and other companies. Many workers feel overworked, underpaid and put at undue health risk from the virus, Campos-Medina said. “Union members are angry,” she declared. O’Brien and Vairma did not respond to requests for comment. The Teamsters declined comment, citing a law requiring strict neutrality in the election process. UPS also declined comment. However, CEO Carol B. Tomé and CFO Brian Newman told a group of retirees last week that UPS is committed to maintaining peace on the labor front, according to a person who heard the exchange.

    Irresistible force meets immovable object

    In Tomé, the Teamsters will face a CEO who has faced down UPS’ largest customers that have historically used high volumes as a weapon to negotiate lower rates. She has transformed one of America’s most deeply rooted corporate cultures and has made clear there will be few, if any, sacred cows on her march toward margin expansion through cost cuts and a more profitable mix of business. Ironically, the current contract is a bargain of sorts for UPS in that it shields the company from the impact of surging labor cost-inflation. Branden Burt, director of operations at consultancy Transportation Impact LLC, estimates that UPS budgeted 2.3% labor cost increases over the life of the contract. By contrast, arch-rival FedEx Corp. (NYSE:FDX), which runs a nonunion shop save for its pilots, is facing the full brunt of escalating labor costs, Burt said. Still, UPS is well aware that its labor tab, which according to data from SJ Consulting accounts for 56% of its total operating expense, may not be sustainable over the long-term in a world where the promise of “free” shipping has forced businesses to cut their labor costs in order to remain profitable and competitive. “It’s a race to the bottom” to lower delivery expenses for UPS and FedEx, said Dean Maciuba, managing partner, North America, for consultancy Last Mile Experts. The flashpoint in the upcoming talks could be Tomé’s interest in creating a same-day delivery service using a network of micro-fulfillment centers that would support on-demand deliveries. During UPS’ investor day in June, Tomè said the company was piloting a same-day model that could operate outside its current network. “As soon as she said that, you could hear howls of anger coming from the Teamsters,” said the industry executive.

    The micro-fulfillment center model, which calls for the forward stocking of inventories in smaller fulfillment centers in residential areas, is being seen as a way to reduce transportation costs while bringing e-commerce deliveries closer to the end customer. However, it would be nearly impossible to run such an operation within the existing UPS infrastructure. The Teamsters would not look kindly on that business not touching union hands, especially as it becomes a larger slice of the delivery pie.

    UPS’ labor costs are now “so disproportionate compared to everyone else” that it can’t afford to emerge from the next contract talks without substantial cost savings, Maciuba said. It made some headway in the 2018 contract when the Teamsters agreed to a new class of junior drivers who would work nontraditional hours and get paid less than their counterparts with seniority. UPS also realized labor cost savings with the sale earlier this year of UPS Freight, its unionized LTL unit carrier, to Canadian carrier TFI International (NYSE:TFII). However, Maciuba said UPS will need to extract even more savings this time around, especially with FedEx systematically integrating its Express and Ground units, a program that could make the company more efficient and competitive with UPS, and with Amazon. com Inc. (NASDAQ:AMZN) and its fast-growing, nonunion operations possibly forging a low-cost rival for UPS’ traffic.

    Whoever takes the Teamsters reins in November could take a hard line against any cost-saving proposals by citing UPS’ spiking revenue and 12% or so operating margins as justification for the company paying more or, at least, cutting less. However, such stellar results may be difficult to replicate should delivery growth level off and the competition becomes more intense. Campos-Medina of Cornell said that O’Brien, if he wins, would need to be realistic about the current and, perhaps more important from a contractual standpoint, future business environment for the company and its workers. “O’Brien would have to agree to some concessions,” she said. Maciuba said UPS could counter the Teamsters’ argument by arguing that the company’s current performance represents a peak and that the future won’t be as extraordinarily profitable. “They could argue that 12% operating margins are as good as it gets, and they would probably be right,” he said.

    https://www.freightwaves.com/news/te...contract-talks

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  5. #4
    Old School... and proud!!

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    Default Re: 2021 IBT Election

    Full General President Candidates’ Debate Video...


 

 

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